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Cybercrime and Cybersecurity in the Global South.

By: Kshetri, Nir.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.International Political Economy Series: Publisher: Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013Description: 1 online resource (262 p.).ISBN: 9781137021946.Subject(s): Computer crimes -- Developing countries -- Prevention | Computer crimes -- Developing countries | Computer crimesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Cybercrime and Cybersecurity in the Global SouthDDC classification: 364.16 | 364.16/8091724 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; List of Figures and Tables; Preface and Acknowledgements; 1 Cybercrime and Cybersecurity in the Global South: Status, Drivers and Trends; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Cybercrime and cybersecurity issues in relation to the international political economy; 1.3 Definitions of major terms; 1.4 A review of cybercrimes in the GS; 1.5 The GN-GS structural differences in cybercrime and cybersecurity; 1.6 A typology of cybercrimes in the GS; 1.7 Concluding comments; 2 Technological and Global Forces Shaping Cybercrime and Cybersecurity in the Global South; 2.1 Introduction
2.2 Technological forces2.3 Global forces; 2.4 Concluding comments; 3 Cybercrime and Cybersecurity in the Former Soviet Union and Central and Eastern Europe; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Assessing the nature, extent and impact of cybercrimes associated with the region; 3.3 Formal and informal institutions related to cybercrime; 3.4 The push and pull factors related to cybercrimes; 3.5 International collaboration, cooperation and partnership; 3.6 Case studies of some firms from the region engaged in cybercrimes; 3.7 Discussion and implications; 4 Cybercrime and Cybersecurity in China
4.1 Introduction4.2 A survey of cybercrimes associated with China; 4.3 Structure of the Chinese economy in relation to cyber crimes originating from and affecting the country; 4.4 Institutional factors; 4.5 Concluding comments; 5 Cybercrime and Cybersecurity in India; 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 An overview of cybercrimes in India; 5.3 Structure of the Indian economy in relation to cybercrimes originating from and affecting the country; 5.4 Institutions related to cybercrimes; 5.5 A Case study of NASSCOM's efforts in enhancing cybersecurity in the Indian offshoring industry
5.6 Discussion and implications5.7 Concluding comments; 6 Cybercrime and Cybersecurity in the Middle East and North African Economies; 6.1 Introduction; 6.2 A survey of cybercrimes associated with the MENA economies; 6.3 Structure of the MENA economies in relation to cybercrimes originating from and affecting them; 6.4 Institutions related to cybercrimes in MENA; 6.5 Discussion and implications; 6.6 Concluding comments; 7 Cybercrime and Cybersecurity in Latin American and Caribbean Economies; 7.1 Introduction; 7.2 The escalation of cybercrime activities associated with LAC economies
7.3 Economic factors7.4 Institutional factors related to cybercrimes in LAC economies; 7.5 Natures of organized crime and cybercrime groups in LAC economies; 7.6 Concluding comments; 8 Cybercrime and Cybersecurity in Sub-Saharan African Economies; 8.1 Introduction; 8.2 SSA's digitization: The cybercrime and cybersecurity dimensions; 8.3 Hollowness in Africa's digitization initiatives; 8.4 Externalities in the SSA cybercrime industry; 8.5 Progresses on the institutional and technological fronts; 8.6 Concluding comments; 9 Cybercrime and Cybersecurity in the Developing Pacific Island Economies
9.1 Introduction
Summary: Integrating theories from a wide range of disciplines, Nir Kshetri compares the patterns, characteristics and processes of cybercrime activities in major regions and economies in the Global South such as China, India, the former Second World economies, Latin America and the Caribbean, Sub-Saharan Africa and Middle East and North Africa.
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HV6773.23 .D44 K74 2013 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1161422 Available EBL1161422
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HV6773 Dot.cons. HV6773 Cyber Bullying : HV6773.15.O58 M378 2013 Online Child Sexual Abuse : HV6773.23 .D44 K74 2013 Cybercrime and Cybersecurity in the Global South. HV6773.5 .R33 Racial Ethnic and Homophobic Violence. HV6773.52 .A47 2005eb Hate Crimes : HV6773.52 .E4 2009 Hate crimes and ethnoviolence :

Cover; Contents; List of Figures and Tables; Preface and Acknowledgements; 1 Cybercrime and Cybersecurity in the Global South: Status, Drivers and Trends; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Cybercrime and cybersecurity issues in relation to the international political economy; 1.3 Definitions of major terms; 1.4 A review of cybercrimes in the GS; 1.5 The GN-GS structural differences in cybercrime and cybersecurity; 1.6 A typology of cybercrimes in the GS; 1.7 Concluding comments; 2 Technological and Global Forces Shaping Cybercrime and Cybersecurity in the Global South; 2.1 Introduction

2.2 Technological forces2.3 Global forces; 2.4 Concluding comments; 3 Cybercrime and Cybersecurity in the Former Soviet Union and Central and Eastern Europe; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Assessing the nature, extent and impact of cybercrimes associated with the region; 3.3 Formal and informal institutions related to cybercrime; 3.4 The push and pull factors related to cybercrimes; 3.5 International collaboration, cooperation and partnership; 3.6 Case studies of some firms from the region engaged in cybercrimes; 3.7 Discussion and implications; 4 Cybercrime and Cybersecurity in China

4.1 Introduction4.2 A survey of cybercrimes associated with China; 4.3 Structure of the Chinese economy in relation to cyber crimes originating from and affecting the country; 4.4 Institutional factors; 4.5 Concluding comments; 5 Cybercrime and Cybersecurity in India; 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 An overview of cybercrimes in India; 5.3 Structure of the Indian economy in relation to cybercrimes originating from and affecting the country; 5.4 Institutions related to cybercrimes; 5.5 A Case study of NASSCOM's efforts in enhancing cybersecurity in the Indian offshoring industry

5.6 Discussion and implications5.7 Concluding comments; 6 Cybercrime and Cybersecurity in the Middle East and North African Economies; 6.1 Introduction; 6.2 A survey of cybercrimes associated with the MENA economies; 6.3 Structure of the MENA economies in relation to cybercrimes originating from and affecting them; 6.4 Institutions related to cybercrimes in MENA; 6.5 Discussion and implications; 6.6 Concluding comments; 7 Cybercrime and Cybersecurity in Latin American and Caribbean Economies; 7.1 Introduction; 7.2 The escalation of cybercrime activities associated with LAC economies

7.3 Economic factors7.4 Institutional factors related to cybercrimes in LAC economies; 7.5 Natures of organized crime and cybercrime groups in LAC economies; 7.6 Concluding comments; 8 Cybercrime and Cybersecurity in Sub-Saharan African Economies; 8.1 Introduction; 8.2 SSA's digitization: The cybercrime and cybersecurity dimensions; 8.3 Hollowness in Africa's digitization initiatives; 8.4 Externalities in the SSA cybercrime industry; 8.5 Progresses on the institutional and technological fronts; 8.6 Concluding comments; 9 Cybercrime and Cybersecurity in the Developing Pacific Island Economies

9.1 Introduction

Integrating theories from a wide range of disciplines, Nir Kshetri compares the patterns, characteristics and processes of cybercrime activities in major regions and economies in the Global South such as China, India, the former Second World economies, Latin America and the Caribbean, Sub-Saharan Africa and Middle East and North Africa.

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Nir Kshetri is Associate Professor at The University of North Carolina-Greensboro, USA and research fellow at Kobe University, Japan. He has authored about sixty journal articles and three books. Various United Nations Agencies, the US Army War College and private organizations have invited him to give talks on cybersecurity.

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