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The Magdalenes [electronic resource] : Prostitution in the Nineteenth Century

By: Mahood, Linda.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Routledge Library Editions: Women''s History: Publisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2013Description: 1 online resource (223 p.).ISBN: 9781136247835.Subject(s): Law enforcement -- Scotland -- History -- 19th century | Prostitutes -- Rehabilitation -- Scotland -- History -- 19th century | Prostitution -- Scotland -- History -- 19th century | Sexually transmitted diseases -- Law and legislation -- Scotland -- History -- 19th century | Working class women -- Sexual behavior -- Scotland -- History -- 19th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Magdalenes : Prostitution in the Nineteenth CenturyDDC classification: 306.74/2/0941109034 | 306.7420941109034 LOC classification: HQ187.A5 M34 2013Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Cover; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Acknowledgements; Introduction: The deployment of ''dangerous'' female sexualities; Part one: The birth of social medicine and the state; 1 ''Harlots, witches and bar-maids'': Prostitution, disease, and the state, 1497-1800; 2 A medical model of immorality: The Glasgow Lock Hospital; 3 Familiarity with the illicit; Part two: Philanthropy, piety, and the state; 4 An invitation to discourse; 5 The domestication of ''fallen'' women; 6 Friendless, fallen, and inebriate women: The transformations
Part three: The Glasgow system: Police repression or veiled regulation?7 Fighting the ''multitudinous amazonian army''; 8 Police repression or veiled regulation?; Conclusion: Prostitutes, Magdalenes, and wayward girls: Dangerous sexualities of working-class women; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: The nineteenth century witnessed a discursive explosion around the subject of sex. Historical evidence indicates that the sexual behaviour which had always been punishable began to be spoken of, regulated, and policed in new ways. Prostitutes were no longer dragged through the town, dunked in lakes, whipped and branded. Medieval forms of punishment shifted from the emphasis on punishing the body to punishing the mind.Building on the work of Foucault, Walkowitz, and Mort, Linda Mahood traces and examines new approached emerging throughout the nineteenth century towards prostitution and looks at the apparatus and institutions created for its regulation and control. In particular, throughout the century, the bourgeoisie contributed regularly to the discourse on the prostitution problem, the debate focusing on the sexual and vocational behaviour of working class women. The thrust of the discourse, however, was not just repression or control but the moral reform - through religious training, moral education, and training in domestic service - of working class women.With her emphasis on Scottish ''magdalene'' homes and a case study of the system of police repression used in Glasgow, Linda Mahood has written the first book of its kind dealing with these issues in Scotland. At the same time the book sets nineteenth-century treatment of prostitutes in Scotland into the longer run of British attempts to control ''drabs and harlots'', and contributes to the wider discussion of ''dangerous female sexuality'' in a male-dominated society.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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HQ187.A5 M346 2013 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1244670 Available EBL1244670

Description based upon print version of record.

Cover; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Acknowledgements; Introduction: The deployment of ''dangerous'' female sexualities; Part one: The birth of social medicine and the state; 1 ''Harlots, witches and bar-maids'': Prostitution, disease, and the state, 1497-1800; 2 A medical model of immorality: The Glasgow Lock Hospital; 3 Familiarity with the illicit; Part two: Philanthropy, piety, and the state; 4 An invitation to discourse; 5 The domestication of ''fallen'' women; 6 Friendless, fallen, and inebriate women: The transformations

Part three: The Glasgow system: Police repression or veiled regulation?7 Fighting the ''multitudinous amazonian army''; 8 Police repression or veiled regulation?; Conclusion: Prostitutes, Magdalenes, and wayward girls: Dangerous sexualities of working-class women; Notes; Bibliography; Index

The nineteenth century witnessed a discursive explosion around the subject of sex. Historical evidence indicates that the sexual behaviour which had always been punishable began to be spoken of, regulated, and policed in new ways. Prostitutes were no longer dragged through the town, dunked in lakes, whipped and branded. Medieval forms of punishment shifted from the emphasis on punishing the body to punishing the mind.Building on the work of Foucault, Walkowitz, and Mort, Linda Mahood traces and examines new approached emerging throughout the nineteenth century towards prostitution and looks at the apparatus and institutions created for its regulation and control. In particular, throughout the century, the bourgeoisie contributed regularly to the discourse on the prostitution problem, the debate focusing on the sexual and vocational behaviour of working class women. The thrust of the discourse, however, was not just repression or control but the moral reform - through religious training, moral education, and training in domestic service - of working class women.With her emphasis on Scottish ''magdalene'' homes and a case study of the system of police repression used in Glasgow, Linda Mahood has written the first book of its kind dealing with these issues in Scotland. At the same time the book sets nineteenth-century treatment of prostitutes in Scotland into the longer run of British attempts to control ''drabs and harlots'', and contributes to the wider discussion of ''dangerous female sexuality'' in a male-dominated society.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Mahood's study of Scottish prostitution in the Victorian era is essentially an exercise in the application of the methodology of "discourse analysis." Depending very heavily on the analytical strategies of Michel Foucault, Mahood describes, with careful reference to an extensive body of data, the systems developed in 19th-century Glasgow and Edinburgh for the social control of "prostitutes" (she always places the word in quotation marks to indicate that it is a socially constructed concept). Mahood notes the failure of Scotland to implement the Contagious Diseases Act employed in other parts of Britain. This, together with the development (especially in Glasgow) of an integrated system of lock hospitals for the treatment of venereal disease and Magdalene Houses (reformatories for "fallen women"), makes the Scottish case different enough from the larger British situation to justify Mahood's study. Her work supplements the broader studies of J. Walkowitz and P. McHugh. Thoroughly annotated, with an extensive bibliography of both primary sources and recent theoretical writing, this would be a useful volume for a strong research library. -M. M. Garland, The Ohio State University

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