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Hanoi's Road to the Vietnam War, 1954-1965.

By: Asselin, Pierre.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Berkeley : University of California Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource (348 p.).ISBN: 9780520956551.Subject(s): Vietnam (Democratic Republic) -- Foreign relations | Vietnam (Democratic Republic) -- History | Vietnam War, 1961-1975 -- CausesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Hanoi's Road to the Vietnam War, 1954-1965DDC classification: 959.704/31 | 959.70431 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; List of Maps; Foreword by the Series Editors; Acknowledgments; Glossary of Terms and Acronyms; Introduction; 1 Choosing Peace, 1954-1956; 2 Changing Course, 1957-1959; 3 Treading Cautiously, 1960; 4 Buying Time, 1961; Images; 5 Exploring Neutralization, 1962; 6 Choosing War, 1963; 7 Waging War, 1964; Epilogue; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: Hanoi's Road to the Vietnam War opens in 1954 with the signing of the Geneva accords that ended the eight-year-long Franco-Indochinese War and created two Vietnams. In agreeing to the accords, Ho Chi Minh and other leaders of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam anticipated a new period of peace leading to national reunification under their rule; they never imagined that within a decade they would be engaged in an even bigger feud with the United States. Basing his work on new and largely inaccessible Vietnamese materials as well as French, British, Canadian, and American documents, Pierr
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
DS560.68 .A87 2013 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1251020 Available EBL1251020

Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; List of Maps; Foreword by the Series Editors; Acknowledgments; Glossary of Terms and Acronyms; Introduction; 1 Choosing Peace, 1954-1956; 2 Changing Course, 1957-1959; 3 Treading Cautiously, 1960; 4 Buying Time, 1961; Images; 5 Exploring Neutralization, 1962; 6 Choosing War, 1963; 7 Waging War, 1964; Epilogue; Notes; Bibliography; Index

Hanoi's Road to the Vietnam War opens in 1954 with the signing of the Geneva accords that ended the eight-year-long Franco-Indochinese War and created two Vietnams. In agreeing to the accords, Ho Chi Minh and other leaders of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam anticipated a new period of peace leading to national reunification under their rule; they never imagined that within a decade they would be engaged in an even bigger feud with the United States. Basing his work on new and largely inaccessible Vietnamese materials as well as French, British, Canadian, and American documents, Pierr

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Books published on the Vietnam War number in the thousands, but the vast majority looks at the war through a US lens, placing blame or credit with US leaders. Asselin (Hawai'i Pacific Univ.) brings a different approach, looking at the road to war taken by North Vietnamese leadership. While many key internal documents of the North Vietnamese government remain classified, Asselin uses recently released sources to make his argument. He updates previous scholarship provided by William Duiker's The Communist Road to Power in Vietnam (CH, Apr'82). Asselin portrays a North Vietnamese leadership that operated independently of Soviet or Chinese influence, but that was thoroughly communist rather than nationalist in purpose. Asselin views the North Vietnamese as the driving force behind the war, frequently acting in quiet defiance of Soviet policies and goals. He argues that the conflict was utterly unavoidable by US leaders once hard-liners Le Duan and Nguyen Chi Thanh gained control of the North Vietnamese Politburo in 1963. While many historians will argue with the deterministic viewpoint that the Vietnam War was inevitable and unavoidable for the US, this remains an extremely important and useful book for gaining an understanding of North Vietnamese goals and thought processes. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. D. R. Graber Wayne State College

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