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The Epic Gaze : Vision, Gender and Narrative in Ancient Epic

By: Lovatt, Helen.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource (426 p.).ISBN: 9781107275140.Subject(s): Epic poetry, Greek -- History and criticism | Epic poetry, GreekGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Epic Gaze : Vision, Gender and Narrative in Ancient EpicDDC classification: 883.009 LOC classification: PA3106 .L68 2013Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Preface; Texts and abbreviations; Chapter 1 Introduction; Approaches to vision and theories of 'the gaze'; Cultures of viewing; Ancient thinking about vision; Methodology; Film and text; Chapter summaries; Chapter 2 The divine gaze; The gaze of Zeus; Structure, transition and the divine gaze; Fractious viewing: divine audiences and dissent; Hera and Juno: alternative centres of visual power; Jupiter and Juno in Ovid: rape and the imperial gaze; Limits of power and averting the gaze; Conclusions; Chapter 3 The mortal gaze; Looking at gods: visual epiphanies and poetic visions
The divine gaze and theomachy: Diomedes in Iliad 5Seeing the gods in Aeneid 2; Troy and Rome: Hannibal and Juno in Silius' Punica 12; Philosophy and the divine gaze; Philosophical heroes in Flavian epic: Prometheus and Archimedes; The gaze of Capaneus; Lucan, Caesar and the absence of a divine audience; Conclusions; Chapter 4 The prophetic gaze; Prophecy between gods and mortals: seeing and decreeing; Mortal prophets and the powerful gaze; Madness and the gaze; Navigation; Omens and augury; Gender and the prophetic gaze; Blindness, prophecy and the abject; Necromancy; Conclusions
Chapter 5 Ecphrasis and the OtherShields, cloaks and other things; Ecphrasis and divine authority; Mortal makers: the shield of Hannibal; Representing the divine; Natural spaces and narrative transition; Breaking the frame; Cloaks and the female gaze; Objects of ecphrasis: gender; Objects of ecphrasis: the imperial gaze; Returning the gaze: the apotropaic shield; Conclusions; Chapter 6 The female gaze; Dreams and female viewing; Teichoscopy; Gazing at departing heroes; Teichoscopy and the erotic: Propertius and Ovid; Valerius Flaccus' Medea; Statius' Antigone
Quintus and Nonnus: joining in battleLament, aftermath and the female gaze; Conclusions; Chapter 7 Heroic bodies on display; Images of beauty: epic heroes as objects of desire; Heroes and gladiators; Fragmentation, fetishisation and the heroic body; Action heroines; Conclusions; Chapter 8 The assaultive gaze; Blazing eyes; Tropes of the assaultive gaze; The evil eye; Medea and Talos; Battles of the gaze and the end of the Aeneid; Statius, Pietas and another final confrontation; The hostile gaze in epic: some conclusions; Chapter 9 Fixing it for good: Medusa and monumentality; Perseus
And MedusaMonumentality; Epic monuments; Pompey; The end of Achilles; Last words; Bibliography; Index locorum; General index
Summary: Re-envisions epic from Homer to Nonnus through theories of the gaze.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PA3106 .L68 2013 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1303635 Available EBL1303635

Cover; Contents; Preface; Texts and abbreviations; Chapter 1 Introduction; Approaches to vision and theories of 'the gaze'; Cultures of viewing; Ancient thinking about vision; Methodology; Film and text; Chapter summaries; Chapter 2 The divine gaze; The gaze of Zeus; Structure, transition and the divine gaze; Fractious viewing: divine audiences and dissent; Hera and Juno: alternative centres of visual power; Jupiter and Juno in Ovid: rape and the imperial gaze; Limits of power and averting the gaze; Conclusions; Chapter 3 The mortal gaze; Looking at gods: visual epiphanies and poetic visions

The divine gaze and theomachy: Diomedes in Iliad 5Seeing the gods in Aeneid 2; Troy and Rome: Hannibal and Juno in Silius' Punica 12; Philosophy and the divine gaze; Philosophical heroes in Flavian epic: Prometheus and Archimedes; The gaze of Capaneus; Lucan, Caesar and the absence of a divine audience; Conclusions; Chapter 4 The prophetic gaze; Prophecy between gods and mortals: seeing and decreeing; Mortal prophets and the powerful gaze; Madness and the gaze; Navigation; Omens and augury; Gender and the prophetic gaze; Blindness, prophecy and the abject; Necromancy; Conclusions

Chapter 5 Ecphrasis and the OtherShields, cloaks and other things; Ecphrasis and divine authority; Mortal makers: the shield of Hannibal; Representing the divine; Natural spaces and narrative transition; Breaking the frame; Cloaks and the female gaze; Objects of ecphrasis: gender; Objects of ecphrasis: the imperial gaze; Returning the gaze: the apotropaic shield; Conclusions; Chapter 6 The female gaze; Dreams and female viewing; Teichoscopy; Gazing at departing heroes; Teichoscopy and the erotic: Propertius and Ovid; Valerius Flaccus' Medea; Statius' Antigone

Quintus and Nonnus: joining in battleLament, aftermath and the female gaze; Conclusions; Chapter 7 Heroic bodies on display; Images of beauty: epic heroes as objects of desire; Heroes and gladiators; Fragmentation, fetishisation and the heroic body; Action heroines; Conclusions; Chapter 8 The assaultive gaze; Blazing eyes; Tropes of the assaultive gaze; The evil eye; Medea and Talos; Battles of the gaze and the end of the Aeneid; Statius, Pietas and another final confrontation; The hostile gaze in epic: some conclusions; Chapter 9 Fixing it for good: Medusa and monumentality; Perseus

And MedusaMonumentality; Epic monuments; Pompey; The end of Achilles; Last words; Bibliography; Index locorum; General index

Re-envisions epic from Homer to Nonnus through theories of the gaze.

Description based upon print version of record.

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