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Big Prisons, Big Dreams : Crime and the Failure of America's Penal System

By: Lynch, Michael.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Critical Issues in Crime and Society: Publisher: New Brunswick, NJ : Rutgers University Press, 2007Description: 1 online resource (274 p.).ISBN: 9780813541402.Subject(s): Criminal justice, Administration of | Criminal justice, Administration of - United States | Criminals - Rehabilitation - United States | Criminals | Imprisonment | Imprisonment - United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Big Prisons, Big Dreams : Crime and the Failure of America's Penal SystemDDC classification: 365.973 | 365/.973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Preface; Chapter 1: Introduction: Big, Dark Secrets and America's Prison System; Chapter 2: Prisons and Crime; Chapter 3: The Growth of America's Prison System; Chapter 4: Raising Questions About America's Big Prison System; Chapter 5: Explaining Prison Growth in the United States: The Materialist Perspective; Chapter 6: Prison Effects: Who Gets Locked Up; Chapter 7: The Imprisonment Binge and Crime; Chapter 8: The End of Oil and the Future of American Prisons?; Chapter 9: A Consuming Culture; Notes; References; Index; About the Author
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HV9304.L96 2007 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=328681 Available EBL328681

Contents; Preface; Chapter 1: Introduction: Big, Dark Secrets and America's Prison System; Chapter 2: Prisons and Crime; Chapter 3: The Growth of America's Prison System; Chapter 4: Raising Questions About America's Big Prison System; Chapter 5: Explaining Prison Growth in the United States: The Materialist Perspective; Chapter 6: Prison Effects: Who Gets Locked Up; Chapter 7: The Imprisonment Binge and Crime; Chapter 8: The End of Oil and the Future of American Prisons?; Chapter 9: A Consuming Culture; Notes; References; Index; About the Author

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Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The prison population explosion that began in the early 1970s demonstrates well US reliance on incarceration as the answer to crime, according to critical criminologist Lynch (Univ. of South Florida). Building on this foundation, the author provides an excellent argument supported by a variety of research data to conclude that this method of crime control has been a tremendous failure. Incorporating the works of Veblen, Durkheim, Rusche and Kirchheimer, Austin and Irwin, Reiman, and others, Lynch concludes that recent growth in US prisons is grounded in US consumer culture, faulty political and public beliefs regarding the use of prison to deter and incapacitate criminals, and increases in the criminalization of behavior associated with those in poverty. The author attributes the reasons for failure to the inability of prisons to address areas that actually cause crime, including the reduction of poverty, the creation of jobs, and the improvement of a variety of problems facing crime-ridden neighborhoods. In summary, while lower-division undergraduates may find the author's analysis somewhat confusing, this work is an excellent addition to library collections in contemporary corrections and social policy. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. C. S. Cooley Mercer County College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Michael J. Lynch is a professor in the department of criminology at the University of South Florida.

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