Another's Country : Archaeological and Historical Perspectives on Cultural Interactions in the Southern Colonies

By: Joseph, J.WContributor(s): Zierden, Martha | Shlasko, Ellen | Elliott, Daniel T | DePratter, Chester B | Zierden, Martha | Joseph, Joseph W | Wheaton, Thomas R | Southerlin, Bobby Gerald | Crass, Dave | Saunders, Katherine A | Hartley, Michael O | Green, William | Beck, Monica | Anthony, Ronald | Adams, Natalie | Steen, Carl | Penner, Bruce R | Forehand, Tammy | Elliott, Rita FolseMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, 2009Description: 1 online resource (303 p.)ISBN: 9780817313418Subject(s): Acculturation | Southern States -- History -- Colonial period, ca. 1600-1775. -- Southern States -- Ethnic relations.Acculturation -- Southern States -- History.Ethnicity -- Southern States -- History.Ethnology -- SoGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Another's Country : Archaeological and Historical Perspectives on Cultural Interactions in the Southern ColoniesDDC classification: 975/.02 LOC classification: F212.A56 2002Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; List of Figures; List of Tables; Foreword; 1 Cultural Diversity in the Southern Colonies; 2 The Yamasee in South Carolina: Native American Adaptation and Interaction along the Carolina Frontier; 3 Colonial African American Plantation Villages; 4 Tangible Interaction: Evidence from Stobo Plantation; 5 A Pattern of Living: A View of the African American Slave Experience in the Pine Forests of the Lower Cape Fear; 6 Guten Tag Bubba: Germans in the Colonial South; 7 An Open-Country Neighborhood in the Southern Colonial Backcountry; 8 Bethania: A Colonial Moravian Adaptation
9 Frenchmen and Africans in South Carolina: Cultural Interaction on the Eighteenth-Century Frontier10 John de la Howe and the Second Wave of French Refugees in the South Carolina Colony: De¤ning, Maintaining, and Losing Ethnicity on the Passing Frontier; 11 Anglicans and Dissenters in the Colonial Village of Dorchester; 12 Frontier Society in South Carolina: An Example from Willtown; 13 "As regular and fformidable as any such woorke in America": The Walled City of Charles Town; 14 From Colonist to Charlestonian: The Crafting of Identity in a Colonial Southern City; Bibliography; Contributors
Index
Summary: The 18th-century South was a true melting pot, bringing together colonists from England, France, Germany, Ireland, Switzerland, and other locations, in addition to African slaves-all of whom shared in the experiences of adapting to a new environment and interacting with American Indians. The shared process of immigration, adaptation, and creolization resulted in a rich and diverse historic mosaic of cultures. The cultural encounters of these groups of settlers would ultimately define the meaning of life in the 19th-century South. The much-studied plantation society of
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Contents; List of Figures; List of Tables; Foreword; 1 Cultural Diversity in the Southern Colonies; 2 The Yamasee in South Carolina: Native American Adaptation and Interaction along the Carolina Frontier; 3 Colonial African American Plantation Villages; 4 Tangible Interaction: Evidence from Stobo Plantation; 5 A Pattern of Living: A View of the African American Slave Experience in the Pine Forests of the Lower Cape Fear; 6 Guten Tag Bubba: Germans in the Colonial South; 7 An Open-Country Neighborhood in the Southern Colonial Backcountry; 8 Bethania: A Colonial Moravian Adaptation

9 Frenchmen and Africans in South Carolina: Cultural Interaction on the Eighteenth-Century Frontier10 John de la Howe and the Second Wave of French Refugees in the South Carolina Colony: De¤ning, Maintaining, and Losing Ethnicity on the Passing Frontier; 11 Anglicans and Dissenters in the Colonial Village of Dorchester; 12 Frontier Society in South Carolina: An Example from Willtown; 13 "As regular and fformidable as any such woorke in America": The Walled City of Charles Town; 14 From Colonist to Charlestonian: The Crafting of Identity in a Colonial Southern City; Bibliography; Contributors

Index

The 18th-century South was a true melting pot, bringing together colonists from England, France, Germany, Ireland, Switzerland, and other locations, in addition to African slaves-all of whom shared in the experiences of adapting to a new environment and interacting with American Indians. The shared process of immigration, adaptation, and creolization resulted in a rich and diverse historic mosaic of cultures. The cultural encounters of these groups of settlers would ultimately define the meaning of life in the 19th-century South. The much-studied plantation society of

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

J.W. Joseph is President and Principal Archaeologist of New South Associates, Inc., an Atlanta-based cultural resource management firm.

Martha Zierden is Curator of Historical Archaeology at The Charleston Museum in Charleston, South Carolina.

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