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Search and Destroy : African-American Males in the Criminal Justice System

By: Miller, Jerome G.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2010Edition: 2nd ed.Description: 1 online resource (214 p.).ISBN: 9781139081986.Subject(s): African American criminals | African American men | Criminal justice, Administration of -- United States | Discrimination in criminal justice administration -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Search and Destroy : African-American Males in the Criminal Justice SystemDDC classification: 364.08996073 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Half-title; Title; Copyright; Contents; Prologue: From Which Aristocratic Colours Peep; 1 The Scope of the Problem; 2 Hyping Violence; 3 Unanticipated Consequences; 4 Race Baiting and Kitsch; 5 The Search for the Criminaloid; 6 Banishing Indecision; Epilogue; Index
Summary: This book addresses widespread social assumptions associating crime and the imprisonment of African-American men.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HV9950 .M55 2011 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=691854 Available EBL691854

Cover; Half-title; Title; Copyright; Contents; Prologue: From Which Aristocratic Colours Peep; 1 The Scope of the Problem; 2 Hyping Violence; 3 Unanticipated Consequences; 4 Race Baiting and Kitsch; 5 The Search for the Criminaloid; 6 Banishing Indecision; Epilogue; Index

This book addresses widespread social assumptions associating crime and the imprisonment of African-American men.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

The title of this volume is a military term that means "find the enemy and eliminate it." This is exactly what Miller, cofounder of the National Center on Institutions and Alternatives, says the American justice system is doing to African American males. Drawing on statistics and examples from the criminal justice system, Miller concludes that crimes committed by black men are treated by the courts with unnecessary severity. He also points out racial bias in the war on drugs and in public housing, as well as the consequences of the "bell curve" and other genetic research. Voluminous notes and references back up his statements. His book should be valuable reading for social workers and criminal justice students as well as general readers. Recommended for all libraries.‘Frances O. Sandiford, Green Haven Correction Facility Lib., Stormville, N.Y. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Miller's new study makes a significant contribution to understanding the nefarious nature of the US criminal justice system. More important, it provides a poignant depiction of all that is wrong with a system of jurisprudence that currently has the highest incarceration rate in the industrialized world (the latest statistics indicate the number exceeds 1.6 million). Using African American males as the target group, Miller paints a sad picture regarding their likely involvement in the criminal justice system. Pivotal in this analysis is the introduction, in which Miller summarizes the deleterious nature of the system. Statistics are presented to show how black males' probability of incarceration is significantly greater than majority males. The author debunks the notion that prisons are full of "predatory and violent" black men, and discusses the history of racial bias in the penal system. He examines both the unanticipated consequences of the justice system and the politics of crime. Chapter 5, on race, applied science, and public policy, is a seminal piece on how so-called scientific evidence is used to justify racial differences (read genetic predispositions to criminality). The final chapter expounds on the future. Citing sources from an international perspective, this informative, riveting, and up-to-date book is a must read. All levels. R. Stewart SUNY College at Buffalo

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