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White Enough to Be American? : Race Mixing, Indigenous People, and the Boundaries of State and Nation

By: Basson, Lauren L.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, 2012Description: 1 online resource (255 p.).ISBN: 9781469606439.Subject(s): Citizenship -- United States -- History | European Americans -- Attitudes -- History | Indians of North America -- Government relations -- History | Indians of North America -- Land tenure -- History | Indians of North America -- Mixed descent -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- History | Miscegenation -- Political aspects -- United States -- History | Nationalism -- United States -- History | Racially mixed people -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- United States -- History | Racially mixed people -- status, laws, etc. -- Hawaii -- History | United States -- Race relations -- Political aspects -- HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: White Enough to Be American? : Race Mixing, Indigenous People, and the Boundaries of State and NationDDC classification: 323.1197 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Note on Terminology; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 ''Mixed Blood'' Americans: The Jane Waldron and Barney Traversee Allotment Disputes; 2 Métis Americans: Louis Riel and the Northwest Territories; 3 Annexed Americans: Robert Wilcox, Home Rule, and Self-Government for Hawaii; 4 Anarchist Americans: Lucy Parsons, Foreign Bodies, and American Soil; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W
Summary: Racial mixture posed a distinct threat to European American perceptions of the nation and state in the late nineteenth century, says Lauren Basson, as it exposed and disrupted the racial categories that organized political and social life in the United States. Offering a provocative conceptual approach to the study of citizenship, nationhood, and race, Basson explores how racial mixture challenged and sometimes changed the boundaries that defined what it meant to be American. Drawing on government documents, press coverage, and firsthand accounts, Basson presents four fascinating case
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E99.M693 B37 2012 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=934389 Available EBL934389

Contents; Note on Terminology; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 ''Mixed Blood'' Americans: The Jane Waldron and Barney Traversee Allotment Disputes; 2 Métis Americans: Louis Riel and the Northwest Territories; 3 Annexed Americans: Robert Wilcox, Home Rule, and Self-Government for Hawaii; 4 Anarchist Americans: Lucy Parsons, Foreign Bodies, and American Soil; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W

Racial mixture posed a distinct threat to European American perceptions of the nation and state in the late nineteenth century, says Lauren Basson, as it exposed and disrupted the racial categories that organized political and social life in the United States. Offering a provocative conceptual approach to the study of citizenship, nationhood, and race, Basson explores how racial mixture challenged and sometimes changed the boundaries that defined what it meant to be American. Drawing on government documents, press coverage, and firsthand accounts, Basson presents four fascinating case

Description based upon print version of record.

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CHOICE Review

Basson (politics and government, Ben-Gurion Univ.) presents a compelling discussion of the juxtaposition of race and citizenship. Using diverse examples, she delves into the historic definition of citizenship and the manner in which the prevailing race of the US has often been the telling factor regarding the trajectory of national expansion and annexation. Basson explores racial definition as it related to land allotment to the Sioux following the Treaty of Fort Laramie and discusses the career of Louis Riel, a Metis activist who held dual citizenship in the US and Canada, worked toward annexation, and was executed for treason by Canada. The annexation of Hawai'i and the efforts of Robert Wilcox demonstrate a differing sort of racial bias, that against "Asians," considered by policy makers to be even more foreign and questionable than Native Americans. Finally, there is the case of Lucy Parsons, an indigenous Mexican and Native American woman who was denigrated because of both her gender and her race. Basson's work demonstrates that the racial question in the US has been and continues to be one that is more complex than merely black and white. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. F. E. Knowles Valdosta State University

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