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Disrupting Savagism : Intersecting Chicana/o, Mexican Immigrant, and Native American Struggles for Self-Representation

By: Aldama, Arturo J.
Contributor(s): Mignolo, Walter D | Saldívar-Hull, Sonia | Silverblatt, Irene.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Latin America Otherwise: Publisher: Durham : Duke University Press, 2001Description: 1 online resource (209 p.).ISBN: 9780822380016.Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Disrupting Savagism : Intersecting Chicana/o, Mexican Immigrant, and Native American Struggles for Self-RepresentationDDC classification: 305.8/00973 LOC classification: F787.A43 2001Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Preface; PART I Mapping Subalternity in the U.S./México Borderlands; 1. The Chicana/o and the Native American ''Other'' Talk Back: Theories of the Speaking Subject in a (Post?)Colonial Context; 2.When Mexicans Talk, Who Listens? The Crisis of Ethnography in Situating Early Voices from the U.S./México Borderlands; PART II Narrative Disruptions: Decolonization, Dangerous Bodies, and the Politics of Space; 3. Counting Coup: Narrative Acts of (Re)Claiming Identity in Ceremony by Leslie Marmon Silko
4. Toward a Hermeneutics of Decolonization: Reading Radical Subjectivities in Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza by Gloria Anzaldúa5. A Border Coda: Dangerous Bodies, Liminality, and the Reclamation of Space in Star Maps by Miguel Arteta; Notes; Selected Bibliography; Index
Summary: Comparative study through discourses by Gaimo, Silko, Anzaldua and others examining the disruption of the boundaries of class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality in Chicano, Mexican and Native American immigrants in the Americas.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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F787.A43 2001 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1167484 Available EBL1167484

Contents; Acknowledgments; Preface; PART I Mapping Subalternity in the U.S./México Borderlands; 1. The Chicana/o and the Native American ''Other'' Talk Back: Theories of the Speaking Subject in a (Post?)Colonial Context; 2.When Mexicans Talk, Who Listens? The Crisis of Ethnography in Situating Early Voices from the U.S./México Borderlands; PART II Narrative Disruptions: Decolonization, Dangerous Bodies, and the Politics of Space; 3. Counting Coup: Narrative Acts of (Re)Claiming Identity in Ceremony by Leslie Marmon Silko

4. Toward a Hermeneutics of Decolonization: Reading Radical Subjectivities in Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza by Gloria Anzaldúa5. A Border Coda: Dangerous Bodies, Liminality, and the Reclamation of Space in Star Maps by Miguel Arteta; Notes; Selected Bibliography; Index

Comparative study through discourses by Gaimo, Silko, Anzaldua and others examining the disruption of the boundaries of class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality in Chicano, Mexican and Native American immigrants in the Americas.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Aldama's highly theoretical approach to three genres of multicultural American literature itself disrupts traditional approaches to literature written by authors considered multicultural and in so doing disrupts the very logic that serves as a foundation for the classification "multicultural." Aldama's deconstruction of the hierarchy of written over oral tradition in "Counting Coup" is a brilliant use of Derridean deconstruction. His use of postcolonial theory in the consideration of hybridity is insightful. His weaving together of personal narrative--for both himself and the authors he considers--and the esoterically professional use of the theories of Derrida, Kristeva, and Said, among others, is simply inspiring. Aldama (Arizona State Univ.) refuses to base his evaluation of these works on their ethnic and historical authenticity. The fine focus on Chicana/o, Mexican immigrant, and Native American writing and writers contributes to a further definition of those categories of multicultural American literature, and--because of the use of "high theory" as a methodological framework--at the same time deconstructs the category. Their value exists, as does the value of any American text, in the realm of ideological production. A rigorous and rewarding reading experience, this study is most appropriate for graduate students, researchers, and faculty. L. Antonette East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Arturo J. Aldama is Assistant Professor of Chicana/o Studies at Arizona State University.<br></p>

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