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Violent Crime : Assessing Race and Ethnic Differences

By: Hawkins, Darnell F.
Contributor(s): Blumstein, Alfred | Farrington, David.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2003Description: 1 online resource (462 p.).ISBN: 9780511068164.Subject(s): Crime and raceGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Violent Crime : Assessing Race and Ethnic DifferencesDDC classification: 364.15089 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Half-title; Series-title; Title; Copyright; Contents; Contributors; Foreword; Editor's Introduction; Contexts and Cautions; Coverage and Scope of Volume; CHAPTER ONE Homicide Risk and Level of Victimization in Two Concentrated Poverty Enclaves: A Black/Hispanic Comparison; CHAPTER TWO Moving Beyond Black and White Violence: African American, Haitian, and Latino Homicides in Miami; CHAPTER THREE Homicide in Los Angeles County: A Study of Latino Victimization; CHAPTER FOUR Economic Correlates of Racial and Ethnic Disparity in Homicide: Houston,1945-1994
CHAPTER FIVE The Race/Ethnicity and Poverty Nexus of Violent Crime: Reconciling Differences in Chicago's Community…CHAPTER SIX Sanction Effects, Violence, and Native North American Street Youth; CHAPTER SEVEN Ethnicity and Interpersonal Violence in a New Zealand Birth Cohort; CHAPTER EIGHT Racist Victimization in England and Wales; CHAPTER NINE Race, Gender, and Woman Battering; CHAPTER TEN Gender Entrapment and African-American Women: An Analysis of Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Intimate Violence; CHAPTER ELEVEN How Can the Relationship between Race and Violence be Explained?
CHAPTER TWELVE "Race Effects" and Conceptual Ambiguity in Violence Research: Bringing Inequality Back InCHAPTER THIRTEEN The Violent Black Male: Conceptions of Race in Criminological Theories; CHAPTER FOURTEEN The Structural-Cultural Perspective: A Theory of Black Male Violence; CHAPTER FIFTEEN A Cultural Psychology Framework for the Study of African-American Morality and Violence; CHAPTER SIXTEEN Racial Discrimination and Violence: A Longitudinal Perspective; CHAPTER SEVENTEEN Honor, Class, and White Southern Violence: A Historical Perspective; References; Author Index; Subject Index
Summary: Analysts have long noted that some societies have much higher rates of criminal violence than others. This series of essays explores the extent and causes of racial and ethnic differences in violent crime in the United States and several other contemporary societies.
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HV6791 .V558 2003eb (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=218161 Available EBL218161
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HV6789 .Z55 1999eb Crime Is Not the Problem : HV6791.M43 1999eb Mentally Disordered Offenders : HV6791 .N38 2010 Why Girls Fight : HV6791 .V558 2003eb Violent Crime : HV6793.T4 Texas Confidential : HV6795.E5 C37 1998 Dirty Dealing : HV6810.5 .D35 2012 Fear and Crime in Latin America :

Cover; Half-title; Series-title; Title; Copyright; Contents; Contributors; Foreword; Editor's Introduction; Contexts and Cautions; Coverage and Scope of Volume; CHAPTER ONE Homicide Risk and Level of Victimization in Two Concentrated Poverty Enclaves: A Black/Hispanic Comparison; CHAPTER TWO Moving Beyond Black and White Violence: African American, Haitian, and Latino Homicides in Miami; CHAPTER THREE Homicide in Los Angeles County: A Study of Latino Victimization; CHAPTER FOUR Economic Correlates of Racial and Ethnic Disparity in Homicide: Houston,1945-1994

CHAPTER FIVE The Race/Ethnicity and Poverty Nexus of Violent Crime: Reconciling Differences in Chicago's Community…CHAPTER SIX Sanction Effects, Violence, and Native North American Street Youth; CHAPTER SEVEN Ethnicity and Interpersonal Violence in a New Zealand Birth Cohort; CHAPTER EIGHT Racist Victimization in England and Wales; CHAPTER NINE Race, Gender, and Woman Battering; CHAPTER TEN Gender Entrapment and African-American Women: An Analysis of Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Intimate Violence; CHAPTER ELEVEN How Can the Relationship between Race and Violence be Explained?

CHAPTER TWELVE "Race Effects" and Conceptual Ambiguity in Violence Research: Bringing Inequality Back InCHAPTER THIRTEEN The Violent Black Male: Conceptions of Race in Criminological Theories; CHAPTER FOURTEEN The Structural-Cultural Perspective: A Theory of Black Male Violence; CHAPTER FIFTEEN A Cultural Psychology Framework for the Study of African-American Morality and Violence; CHAPTER SIXTEEN Racial Discrimination and Violence: A Longitudinal Perspective; CHAPTER SEVENTEEN Honor, Class, and White Southern Violence: A Historical Perspective; References; Author Index; Subject Index

Analysts have long noted that some societies have much higher rates of criminal violence than others. This series of essays explores the extent and causes of racial and ethnic differences in violent crime in the United States and several other contemporary societies.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Editor Hawkins (Univ. of Illinois at Chicago) brings together a group of seasoned researchers in this important book to tackle the difficult question of how to conceptualize and measure race and ethnicity in crime studies. The chapters explore relationships between race, ethnicity, and crime by comparing levels of violence among different racial and ethnic groups, domestically and internationally. Some of the researchers focus on variations in homicide rates between and within racial and ethnic groups in large US cities. Others examine domestic violence, racial hostility, and youth violence within and outside the US. By emphasizing a comparative approach in most of the papers, the editor makes it possible to explore the importance of social context and economic environment in explaining differences in violent crime. The richness of theoretical perspectives included here and a focus on both the characteristics of the individual offenders and the context in which they live as potential determinants of violence make this book a must-read for violence researchers. ^BSumming Up: Essential. Upper-division undergraduates and above. G. Rabrenovic Northeastern University

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