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American Juvenile Justice.

By: Zimring, Franklin E.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press, 2005Description: 1 online resource (259 p.).ISBN: 9781602565524.Subject(s): Juvenile courts | Juvenile delinquency | Juvenile justice, Administration of | Juvenile justice, Administration of - United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: American Juvenile JusticeDDC classification: 364.360973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Introduction; one: Childhood and Public Law before the Revolution; two: Modern Adolescence as a Learner's Permit; three: The Problem of Individual Variation; Conclusion to Part I; four: The Common Thread: Diversion in Juvenile Justice; five: Penal Proportionality for the Young Offender: Notes on Immaturity, Capacity, and Diminished Responsibility; six: Kids, Groups, and Crime: Some Implications of a Well-Known Secret; seven: Two Patterns of Age Progression in Adolescent Crime; eight: The Case of the Disappearing Superpredator: Some Lessons from the 1990s
nine: The Jurisprudence of Teen Pregnancyten: Juvenile or Criminal Court? A Punitive Theory of Waiver; eleven: Reducing the Harms of Minority Overrepresentation in American Juvenile Justice; twelve: Choosing a Coherent Policy toward Juveniles and Guns; thirteen: The Hardest of the Hard Cases: The Young Homicide Offender; Notes and References; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z
Summary: Suitable for courses on the criminology and policy analysis of adolescence, this book focuses on the principles and policy of a distinct system of juvenile justice. It opens with an introduction of the creation of adolescence, presenting a justification for the category of the juvenile or a period of partial responsibility before full adulthood.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HV9104 .Z575 2005eb (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=270964 Available EBL270964

Contents; Introduction; one: Childhood and Public Law before the Revolution; two: Modern Adolescence as a Learner's Permit; three: The Problem of Individual Variation; Conclusion to Part I; four: The Common Thread: Diversion in Juvenile Justice; five: Penal Proportionality for the Young Offender: Notes on Immaturity, Capacity, and Diminished Responsibility; six: Kids, Groups, and Crime: Some Implications of a Well-Known Secret; seven: Two Patterns of Age Progression in Adolescent Crime; eight: The Case of the Disappearing Superpredator: Some Lessons from the 1990s

nine: The Jurisprudence of Teen Pregnancyten: Juvenile or Criminal Court? A Punitive Theory of Waiver; eleven: Reducing the Harms of Minority Overrepresentation in American Juvenile Justice; twelve: Choosing a Coherent Policy toward Juveniles and Guns; thirteen: The Hardest of the Hard Cases: The Young Homicide Offender; Notes and References; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z

Suitable for courses on the criminology and policy analysis of adolescence, this book focuses on the principles and policy of a distinct system of juvenile justice. It opens with an introduction of the creation of adolescence, presenting a justification for the category of the juvenile or a period of partial responsibility before full adulthood.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Zimring (law, Univ. of California, Berkeley), who has very good academic credentials in criminology and criminal justice, appropriately challenges the juvenile justice system by asking what its underlying philosophy is. Though well written, the book does not provide enough detail or cover enough issues to be used as an undergraduate textbook, and the theoretical discussion does not have enough depth for its use as a graduate text. The author's immediate stress on "free choice" comes off as naive, in a sociological sense. Sociological theory would strongly suggest that "free choices" are learned in a sociocultural context and may reasonably lead to choices that are illegal. The volume, also short on social class and gender analysis, seems best placed as a supplementary reader for standard juvenile delinquency and/or juvenile justice texts. Summing Up: Recommended. Undergraduate collections. Lower-division Undergraduates; Upper-division Undergraduates; Two-year Technical Program Students. Reviewed by G. C. Leavitt.

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