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Bad Kids : Race and the Transformation of the Juvenile Court

By: Feld, Barry C.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press, 1999Description: 1 online resource (391 p.).ISBN: 9781602560581.Subject(s): Discrimination in juvenile justice administration | Juvenile courts | Juvenile justice, Administration of | Juvenile justice, Administration of - United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Bad Kids : Race and the Transformation of the Juvenile CourtDDC classification: 364.360973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Figures and Tables; Introduction; ONE: The Social Construction of Childhood and Adolescence; TWO: The Juvenile Court and the ""Rehabilitative Ideal""; THREE: The Constitutional Domestication of the Juvenile Court; FOUR: Procedural Justice in Juvenile Courts: Law on the Books and Law in Action; FIVE: Social Control and Noncriminal Status Offenders: Triage and Privatization; SIX: Delinquent or Criminal? Juvenile Courts' Shrinking Jurisdiction over Serious Young Offenders; SEVEN: Punishment, Treatment, and the Juvenile Court: Sentencing Delinquents
EIGHT: Abolish the Juvenile Court: Sentencing Policy When the Child Is a Criminal and the Criminal Is a ChildEpilogue; References; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; W; Y; Z
Summary: An examination of the social and legal changes that have transformed the juvenile court since the 1970s. The book explores the complex relationship between race and youth crime to explain both Supreme Court decisions and a political impetus to ""get tough"" on young offenders.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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HV9104 .F43 1999eb (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=271042 Available EBL271042

Contents; Figures and Tables; Introduction; ONE: The Social Construction of Childhood and Adolescence; TWO: The Juvenile Court and the ""Rehabilitative Ideal""; THREE: The Constitutional Domestication of the Juvenile Court; FOUR: Procedural Justice in Juvenile Courts: Law on the Books and Law in Action; FIVE: Social Control and Noncriminal Status Offenders: Triage and Privatization; SIX: Delinquent or Criminal? Juvenile Courts' Shrinking Jurisdiction over Serious Young Offenders; SEVEN: Punishment, Treatment, and the Juvenile Court: Sentencing Delinquents

EIGHT: Abolish the Juvenile Court: Sentencing Policy When the Child Is a Criminal and the Criminal Is a ChildEpilogue; References; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; W; Y; Z

An examination of the social and legal changes that have transformed the juvenile court since the 1970s. The book explores the complex relationship between race and youth crime to explain both Supreme Court decisions and a political impetus to ""get tough"" on young offenders.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

This is the latest title in Oxford's "Studies in Crime and Public Policy" series, much of which deals with youth crime and its relationship to society. Feld (Minnesota Law Sch.) is a leading scholar in the field of juvenile justice administration. Here he briefly traces the evolution of the juvenile court from its inception in the early 1900s, with an emphasis on the past three decades. Early juvenile courts were seen as rehabilitative welfare agencies, but with the Supreme Court's emphasis in the 1960s on due process, children began to be seen as defendants. As a result of a series of Supreme Court decisions, Feld asserts, juveniles now receive the "worst of both worlds." He explores the complex relationship between race and youth crime in an attempt to understand the court decisions that lead to procedural justice. He also discusses the recent political impetus to treat juveniles as adults in some cases. His points are well made and persuasive. Recommended for libraries with an interest in juveniles and criminal justice.‘Sandra K. Lindheimer, Middlesex Law Lib., Cambridge, MA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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