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When Brute Force Fails : How to Have Less Crime and Less Punishment

By: Kleiman, Mark A. R.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2009Description: 1 online resource (256 p.).ISBN: 9781400831265.Subject(s): Crime -- United States | Crime prevention -- United States | Criminal justice, Administration of -- United States | Punishment -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: When Brute Force Fails : How to Have Less Crime and Less PunishmentDDC classification: 364.40973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
When Brute Force Fails: How to Have Less Crime and Less Punishment; CONTENTS; Acknowledgments; Introduction: How to Have Less Crime and Less Punishment; 1. The Trap; 2. Thinking about Crime Control; 3. Hope; 4. Tipping, Dynamic Concentration, and the Logic of Deterrence; 5. Crime Despite Punishment; 6. Designing Enforcement Strategies; 7. Crime Control without Punishment; 8. Guns and Gun Control; 9. Drug Policy for Crime Control; 10. What Could Go Wrong?; 11. An Agenda for Crime Control; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: Since the crime explosion of the 1960s, the prison population in the United States has multiplied fivefold, to one prisoner for every hundred adults--a rate unprecedented in American history and unmatched anywhere in the world. Even as the prisoner head count continues to rise, crime has stopped falling, and poor people and minorities still bear the brunt of both crime and punishment. When Brute Force Fails explains how we got into the current trap and how we can get out of it: to cut both crime and the prison population in half within a decade. Mark Kleiman demonstrates that
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HV6789 .K53 2009 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=457843 Available EBL457843
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HV6783.Z56 2007 The Great American Crime Decline. HV6789 .C6814 2005eb The Crime Drop in America. HV6789 .F573 2005 Law and Order : HV6789 .K53 2009 When Brute Force Fails : HV6789 .M34 2006 The Many Colors of Crime : HV6789 .P39 2008 Unequal Crime Decline : HV6789 .S57 2006 Governing through crime :

When Brute Force Fails: How to Have Less Crime and Less Punishment; CONTENTS; Acknowledgments; Introduction: How to Have Less Crime and Less Punishment; 1. The Trap; 2. Thinking about Crime Control; 3. Hope; 4. Tipping, Dynamic Concentration, and the Logic of Deterrence; 5. Crime Despite Punishment; 6. Designing Enforcement Strategies; 7. Crime Control without Punishment; 8. Guns and Gun Control; 9. Drug Policy for Crime Control; 10. What Could Go Wrong?; 11. An Agenda for Crime Control; Notes; Bibliography; Index

Since the crime explosion of the 1960s, the prison population in the United States has multiplied fivefold, to one prisoner for every hundred adults--a rate unprecedented in American history and unmatched anywhere in the world. Even as the prisoner head count continues to rise, crime has stopped falling, and poor people and minorities still bear the brunt of both crime and punishment. When Brute Force Fails explains how we got into the current trap and how we can get out of it: to cut both crime and the prison population in half within a decade. Mark Kleiman demonstrates that

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Public policy scholar Kleiman (UCLA) examines the US's increasing preoccupation with punishment as the only approach to crime prevention and reduction, focusing on the cost of punishment and the numbers suffering punishment. Departing from criminological multi-causal explanations for crime, the author attempts to construct arguments reducing the amount of punishment and cost. He suggests that certainty and swift application of punishment, rather than escalating severity of punishment, should reduce criminal activity and reduce costly incarceration. Kleiman develops that perspective in the first chapter and crafts an equation pointing out the costs of crime to society. Using three programs, he demonstrates how interventions can cost less and reduce crime and tackles how deterrence could reduce crime. Kleiman applies these ideas to law enforcement attempts to reduce crime, with chapters on guns and gun control and drug policy to illustrate this approach. In a reflective chapter, he discusses what could go wrong, and he outlines an agenda for crime control in a final chapter. These last three chapters seem to be the real contribution to current arguments over criminal public policy. Extensive bibliography. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. H. Larson emeritus, University of North Dakota

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Mark A. R. Kleiman is professor of public policy at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is the author of Against Excess: Drug Policy for Results and Marijuana: Costs of Abuse, Costs of Control .

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