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Our Children, Their Children : Confronting Racial and Ethnic Differences in American Juvenile Justice

By: Hawkins, Darnell F.
Contributor(s): Kempf-Leonard, Kimberly.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.MF-Research Network on Adolescent Develo: Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2010Description: 1 online resource (471 p.).ISBN: 9780226319919.Subject(s): Crime and race - United States | Crime and race -- United States | Discrimination in juvenile justice administration - United States | Discrimination in juvenile justice administration -- United States | Juvenile justice, Administration of - United States | Juvenile justice, Administration of -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Our Children, Their Children : Confronting Racial and Ethnic Differences in American Juvenile JusticeDDC classification: 364.36/089/00973 | 364.3608900973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Foreword / Barry A. Krisberg; 1. Introduction / Darnell F. Hawkins and Kimberly Kempf-Leonard; Part 1: Racial and Ethnic Differences in Juvenile Crime and Punishment: Past and Present; 2. The Role of Race and Ethnicity in Juvenile Justice Processing / Donna M. Bishop; 3. Racial and Ethnic Differences in Juvenile Offending / Janet L. Lauritsen; 4. Degrees of Discretion: The First Juvenile Court and the Problem of Difference in the Early Twentieth Century / David S. Tanenhaus; 5. Race and the Jurisprudence of Juvenile Justice: A Tale in Two Parts, 1950-2000 / Barry C. Feld
Part 2: Understanding Race Differences in Offending and the Administration of Justice6. Suburban Sprawl, Race, and Juvenile Justice / Paul A. Jargowsky, Scott A. Desmond, and Robert D. Crutchfield; 7. Race and Crime: The Contribution of Individual, Familial, and Neighborhood-Level Risk Factors to Life-Course-Persistent Offending / Alex R. Piquero, Terrie E. Moffitt, and Brian Lawton; 8. Explaining Assessments of Future Risk: Race and Attributions of Juvenile Offenders in Presentencing Reports / Sara Steen, Christine E. W. Bond, George S. Bridges, and Charis E. Kubrin
9. " Justice by Geography": Racial Disparity and Juvenile Courts / Timothy M. Bray, Lisa L. Sample, and Kimberly Kempf-Leonard10. Race, Ethnicity, and Juvenile Justice: Is There Bias in Postarrest Decision Making? / Paul E. Tracy; Part 3: Toward Remedial Social Policy; 11. Disproportionate Minority Confinement/Contact ( DMC): The Federal Initiative / Carl E. Pope and Michael J. Leiber; 12. Mental Health Issues among Minority Offenders in the Juvenile Justice System / Elizabeth Cauffman and Thomas Grisso
13. Minimizing Harm from Minority Disproportion in American Juvenile Justice / Franklin E. ZimringConclusion: Our Children, Their Children / Kimberly Kempf-Leonard and Darnell F. Hawkins; Contributors; Subject Index
Summary: In Our Children, Their Children, a prominent team of researchers argues that a second-rate and increasingly punitive juvenile justice system is allowed to persist because most people believe it is designed for children in other ethnic and socioeconomic groups. While public opinion, laws, and social policies that convey distinctions between ""our children"" and ""their children"" may seem to conflict with the American ideal of blind justice, they are hardly at odds with patterns of group differentiation and inequality that have characterized much of American history. Our
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HV9104 .O97 2010 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=496605 Available EBL496605

Contents; Foreword / Barry A. Krisberg; 1. Introduction / Darnell F. Hawkins and Kimberly Kempf-Leonard; Part 1: Racial and Ethnic Differences in Juvenile Crime and Punishment: Past and Present; 2. The Role of Race and Ethnicity in Juvenile Justice Processing / Donna M. Bishop; 3. Racial and Ethnic Differences in Juvenile Offending / Janet L. Lauritsen; 4. Degrees of Discretion: The First Juvenile Court and the Problem of Difference in the Early Twentieth Century / David S. Tanenhaus; 5. Race and the Jurisprudence of Juvenile Justice: A Tale in Two Parts, 1950-2000 / Barry C. Feld

Part 2: Understanding Race Differences in Offending and the Administration of Justice6. Suburban Sprawl, Race, and Juvenile Justice / Paul A. Jargowsky, Scott A. Desmond, and Robert D. Crutchfield; 7. Race and Crime: The Contribution of Individual, Familial, and Neighborhood-Level Risk Factors to Life-Course-Persistent Offending / Alex R. Piquero, Terrie E. Moffitt, and Brian Lawton; 8. Explaining Assessments of Future Risk: Race and Attributions of Juvenile Offenders in Presentencing Reports / Sara Steen, Christine E. W. Bond, George S. Bridges, and Charis E. Kubrin

9. " Justice by Geography": Racial Disparity and Juvenile Courts / Timothy M. Bray, Lisa L. Sample, and Kimberly Kempf-Leonard10. Race, Ethnicity, and Juvenile Justice: Is There Bias in Postarrest Decision Making? / Paul E. Tracy; Part 3: Toward Remedial Social Policy; 11. Disproportionate Minority Confinement/Contact ( DMC): The Federal Initiative / Carl E. Pope and Michael J. Leiber; 12. Mental Health Issues among Minority Offenders in the Juvenile Justice System / Elizabeth Cauffman and Thomas Grisso

13. Minimizing Harm from Minority Disproportion in American Juvenile Justice / Franklin E. ZimringConclusion: Our Children, Their Children / Kimberly Kempf-Leonard and Darnell F. Hawkins; Contributors; Subject Index

In Our Children, Their Children, a prominent team of researchers argues that a second-rate and increasingly punitive juvenile justice system is allowed to persist because most people believe it is designed for children in other ethnic and socioeconomic groups. While public opinion, laws, and social policies that convey distinctions between ""our children"" and ""their children"" may seem to conflict with the American ideal of blind justice, they are hardly at odds with patterns of group differentiation and inequality that have characterized much of American history. Our

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Darnell F. Hawkins is professor emeritus of African American studies, sociology, and criminal justice at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He is the editor or author of several volumes, including, most recently, Violent Crimes: Assessing Race and Differences. Kimberly Kempf-Leonard is professor of sociology, crime and justice studies, and political economy at the University of Texas at Dallas. She is the editor of the Encyclopedia of Social Measurement. <br>

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