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Language of the Gun : Youth, Crime, and Public Policy

By: Harcourt, Bernard E.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2010Description: 1 online resource (294 p.).ISBN: 9780226316079.Subject(s): Catalina Mountain School | Catalina Mountain School | Firearms - Social aspects | Firearms -- Social aspects | Firearms and crime | Firearms and crime | Firearms ownership - United States | Firearms ownership -- United States | Gun control - United States | Gun control -- United States | Juvenile delinquents - Arizona - Tucson - Attitudes | Juvenile delinquents -- Arizona -- Tucson -- Attitudes | Social sciences - Philosophy | Social sciences -- Philosophy | Youth and violence | Youth and violenceGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Language of the Gun : Youth, Crime, and Public PolicyDDC classification: 303.6/0835 | 303.60835 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Preface; Part One: A Semiotic of the Gun; 1. Catalina Mountain School, Tucson, Arizona; 2. A Road Map of the Catalina Interviews; 3. Symbolic Dimensions and Primary Meanings; 4. Three Clusters of Primary Meanings; 5. Placing the Clusters in Practice Contexts; 6. The Sensual, Moral, and Political Dimensions of Guns; Part Two: Exploring Methodological Sensibilities; 7. Sartre and the Phenomenological Gaze; 8. Lévi-Strauss and the Structural Map; 9. Bourdieu and Practice Theory; 10. Butler and the Performative; 11. Embracing the Paradigm of Dirty Hands
Part Three: Mapping Law and Public Policy12. A Genealogy of the Youth Gun Field; 13. The Landscape of Law and Public Policy; 14. Leaps of Faith in Levitt and Bourgois; 15. Making Ethical Choices in Law and Public Policy; Acknowledgments; Appendix: Treatment of Juvenile Records in State Sentencing; Notes; References; Index
Summary: Legal and public policies concerning youth gun violence tend to rely heavily on crime reports, survey data, and statistical methods. Rarely is attention given to the young voices belonging to those who carry high-powered semiautomatic handguns. In Language of the Gun, Bernard E. Harcourt recounts in-depth interviews with youths detained at an all-malecorrectional facility, exploring how they talk about guns and what meanings they ascribe to them in a broader attempt to understand some of the assumptions implicit in current handgun policies. In the process, Harcourt redraws the rela
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HV9105.A68 .H37 2010 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=496618 Available EBL496618

Contents; Preface; Part One: A Semiotic of the Gun; 1. Catalina Mountain School, Tucson, Arizona; 2. A Road Map of the Catalina Interviews; 3. Symbolic Dimensions and Primary Meanings; 4. Three Clusters of Primary Meanings; 5. Placing the Clusters in Practice Contexts; 6. The Sensual, Moral, and Political Dimensions of Guns; Part Two: Exploring Methodological Sensibilities; 7. Sartre and the Phenomenological Gaze; 8. Lévi-Strauss and the Structural Map; 9. Bourdieu and Practice Theory; 10. Butler and the Performative; 11. Embracing the Paradigm of Dirty Hands

Part Three: Mapping Law and Public Policy12. A Genealogy of the Youth Gun Field; 13. The Landscape of Law and Public Policy; 14. Leaps of Faith in Levitt and Bourgois; 15. Making Ethical Choices in Law and Public Policy; Acknowledgments; Appendix: Treatment of Juvenile Records in State Sentencing; Notes; References; Index

Legal and public policies concerning youth gun violence tend to rely heavily on crime reports, survey data, and statistical methods. Rarely is attention given to the young voices belonging to those who carry high-powered semiautomatic handguns. In Language of the Gun, Bernard E. Harcourt recounts in-depth interviews with youths detained at an all-malecorrectional facility, exploring how they talk about guns and what meanings they ascribe to them in a broader attempt to understand some of the assumptions implicit in current handgun policies. In the process, Harcourt redraws the rela

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

What do guns symbolize to the adolescents and young men who use or own them? Harcourt (law, Univ. of Chicago) attempts to answer this question from interviews with 30 incarcerated youths. He discerns "three clusters of primary meanings of guns": they provide protection and symbolize power, danger, and action; they are a commodity that can be sold for money; and they are a means of gaining respect and a source of reputation. In part 2, the author seeks to "expose the hidden assumptions about human behavior that underlie our social science methods," labeling those methods as phenomenological, structuralist, practice-oriented, and performative--all barely recognizable by most social scientists. In part 3, which is murkier still, Harcourt's concern is to assess existing policies and laws as they pertain to the ownership and use of guns by youth. This book promises more than it delivers. The attempt to elucidate hidden assumptions in either social science methods or laws, even if successful, seems unnecessary to arrive at the provocative notion that policies and laws should emerge out of an understanding of the meaning of guns. ^BSumming Up: Optional. Researchers/faculty. D. Harper University of Rochester

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Bernard E. Harcourt is professor of law at the University of Chicago. He is the author of Illusion of Order: The False Promise of Broken Windows Policing and the editor of Guns, Crime, and Punishment in America .<br>

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