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The Cycle of Juvenile Justice.

By: Bernard, Thomas J.
Contributor(s): Kurlychek, Megan C.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, USA, 2010Edition: 2nd ed.Description: 1 online resource (252 p.).ISBN: 9780199708253.Subject(s): Juvenile justice, Administration of - History | Juvenile justice, Administration of - United States - HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Cycle of Juvenile JusticeDDC classification: 364.360973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; 1. Ideas and the Cycle of Juvenile Justice; 2. What Stays the Same in History?; 3. The Origin of Juvenile Delinquency; 4. The Origin of Juvenile Justice: Juvenile Institutions; 5. The Origin of Juvenile Justice: The Juvenile Court; 6. The Supreme Court and Due Process; 7. Due Process and Adjudication Hearings: An Idea That Didn't Sell; 8. Disposition Hearings Today: The "Get Tough" Movement; 9. Youths in the Adult System; 10. Juvenile Justice in the Twenty-first Century; 11. The Lessons of History Applied Today; 12. The End of Juvenile Delinquency?; Index
Summary: The Cycle of Juvenile Justice takes a historical look at juvenile justice policies in the United States. Tracing a pattern of policies over the past 200 years, the book reveals cycles of reforms advocating either lenient treatment or harsh punishments for juvenile delinquents. Bernard and Kurlychek see this cycle as driven by several unchanging ideas that force us to repeat, rather than learn from, our history. This timely new edition provides a substantial update from the original, incorporating the vast policy changes from the 1990s to the present, and placing these changes in their broader
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Contents; 1. Ideas and the Cycle of Juvenile Justice; 2. What Stays the Same in History?; 3. The Origin of Juvenile Delinquency; 4. The Origin of Juvenile Justice: Juvenile Institutions; 5. The Origin of Juvenile Justice: The Juvenile Court; 6. The Supreme Court and Due Process; 7. Due Process and Adjudication Hearings: An Idea That Didn't Sell; 8. Disposition Hearings Today: The "Get Tough" Movement; 9. Youths in the Adult System; 10. Juvenile Justice in the Twenty-first Century; 11. The Lessons of History Applied Today; 12. The End of Juvenile Delinquency?; Index

The Cycle of Juvenile Justice takes a historical look at juvenile justice policies in the United States. Tracing a pattern of policies over the past 200 years, the book reveals cycles of reforms advocating either lenient treatment or harsh punishments for juvenile delinquents. Bernard and Kurlychek see this cycle as driven by several unchanging ideas that force us to repeat, rather than learn from, our history. This timely new edition provides a substantial update from the original, incorporating the vast policy changes from the 1990s to the present, and placing these changes in their broader

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The late Bernard (formerly, Pennsylvania State Univ.) and Kurlychek (Univ. at Albany, SUNY) argue in this fine book that consistent and sensible juvenile justice policy can only be accomplished by breaking the existing cycle and learning from, rather than romanticizing about, the past. They identify a three-stage cycle: first, there is a real or imagined sense among the public that juvenile crime rates are inordinately high--higher than in the "good old days"; second, there is a general conception that present policies have failed to address the problem and, in fact, have made matters worse; third, there is a push for "reform" in an effort to reduce juvenile crime. Juvenile crime rates fluctuate over time, as do rates for offenders in other age categories. As this would suggest, they eventually rise again; when they do, the cycle starts again. It has repeated in this fashion for over 200 years. In support of this argument, the book includes 12 chapters, each written in accessible, engaging prose and arranged in an especially organized fashion with a multitude of headings and subheadings to guide the reader through a systematic application of a refreshingly parsimonious model. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. B. K. Pinaire Lehigh University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Thomas J. Bernard was Professor of Crime, Law, and Justice at Pennsylvania State University.Megan C. Kurlychek is an Assistant Professor in the School of Criminal Justice at the University at Albany, SUNY.

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