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Criminal Justice in the United States, 1789-1939.

By: Dale, Elizabeth.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.New Histories of American Law: Publisher: Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2011Description: 1 online resource (194 p.).ISBN: 9781139117869.Subject(s): Criminal justice, Administration of -- United States -- HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Criminal Justice in the United States, 1789–1939DDC classification: 345.73009 | 364.97309/034 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; Introduction; 1 Criminal Justice and the Nation, 1789-1860; CONGRESSIONAL INACTION; THE SUPREME COURT AND CHECKS ON FEDERAL CRIMINAL LAW; ADDITIONAL CHECKS ON FEDERAL POWER; CONCLUSION; 2 Crime and Justice in the States, 1789-1839; PARTIAL TRANSFORMATION OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE; PRACTICES OF PUNISHMENT, 1789-1839; SLAVES AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE; POPULAR JUSTICE; CONCLUSION; 3 Law Versus Justice in the States, 1840-1865; EXTRALEGAL JUSTICE; POLICING; CRIMINAL LAW AS SOCIAL CONTROL; COURT REFORMS; THE INTERSECTION OF LAW AND JUSTICE; CONCLUSION
4 States and Nation, 1860-1900REFORMING CRIMINAL JUSTICE IN THE STATES; RULE OF LAW AND THE COURTS; PUNISHMENTS; CENTRALIZING POWER; ROUGH JUSTICE; CONCLUSION; 5 Criminal Justice, 1900-1936; THE SUPREME COURT AND DUE PROCESS; CRIMINAL JUSTICE IN THE STATES; REFORM OF THE PETTY COURTS; PUNISHMENT IN THE STATES; ROUGH JUSTICE; CONGRESS AND CRIMINAL LAW; CONCLUSION; 6 Rights and the Turn to Law, 1937-1939; FAILURE; LEGALISM AND THE TURN TO RIGHTS; FROM SOVEREIGNS TO SUBJECTS?; Conclusion; Bibliographic Essay; Index
Summary: Traces the development of criminal law in America, from the start of the constitutional era to the rise of the New Deal order.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HV9950 .D35 2011 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=775061 Available EBL775061

Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; Introduction; 1 Criminal Justice and the Nation, 1789-1860; CONGRESSIONAL INACTION; THE SUPREME COURT AND CHECKS ON FEDERAL CRIMINAL LAW; ADDITIONAL CHECKS ON FEDERAL POWER; CONCLUSION; 2 Crime and Justice in the States, 1789-1839; PARTIAL TRANSFORMATION OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE; PRACTICES OF PUNISHMENT, 1789-1839; SLAVES AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE; POPULAR JUSTICE; CONCLUSION; 3 Law Versus Justice in the States, 1840-1865; EXTRALEGAL JUSTICE; POLICING; CRIMINAL LAW AS SOCIAL CONTROL; COURT REFORMS; THE INTERSECTION OF LAW AND JUSTICE; CONCLUSION

4 States and Nation, 1860-1900REFORMING CRIMINAL JUSTICE IN THE STATES; RULE OF LAW AND THE COURTS; PUNISHMENTS; CENTRALIZING POWER; ROUGH JUSTICE; CONCLUSION; 5 Criminal Justice, 1900-1936; THE SUPREME COURT AND DUE PROCESS; CRIMINAL JUSTICE IN THE STATES; REFORM OF THE PETTY COURTS; PUNISHMENT IN THE STATES; ROUGH JUSTICE; CONGRESS AND CRIMINAL LAW; CONCLUSION; 6 Rights and the Turn to Law, 1937-1939; FAILURE; LEGALISM AND THE TURN TO RIGHTS; FROM SOVEREIGNS TO SUBJECTS?; Conclusion; Bibliographic Essay; Index

Traces the development of criminal law in America, from the start of the constitutional era to the rise of the New Deal order.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Dale (Univ. of Florida) assesses the evolution of criminal justice from the nation's infancy to its imminent entry onto the global stage at the outbreak of WW II. The author's valuable study brings into view the traditional analysis of developments at the state and federal levels and also illustrates how popular sovereignty (a phrase that encompasses actions by common folk in mobs and as jurors, duelists, and vigilantes) enforced community ideals of justice during much of the republic's early history. Interesting also is Dale's contention that the states' early dominion over criminal justice was more the result of the national government's inaction than a result of a generally agreed upon imperative of federalism. By describing the national, provincial, and popular struggle over how to define and control criminal justice in the US, Dale has provided a most valuable contribution to those interested in the relationship between order and law. Summing Up: Essential. All libraries as well as undergraduates and graduates. P. Lorenzini Saint Xavier University

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