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Judging Juveniles : Prosecuting Adolescents in Adult and Juvenile Courts

By: Kupchik, Aaron.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.New Perspectives on Crime, Deviance, and Law Series: Publisher: New York : NYU Press, 2006Description: 1 online resource (221 p.).ISBN: 9780814748725.Subject(s): Criminal justice, Administration of -- United States | Juvenile delinquents -- United States | Juvenile justice, Administration of -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Judging Juveniles : Prosecuting Adolescents in Adult and Juvenile CourtsDDC classification: 364.360973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; 1 Introduction: Growing Up Quickly; 2 Law and Context; 3 The Process of Prosecuting Adolescents: How Formal?; 4 Judging Adolescents: What Matters?; 5 Punishment for Adolescents:What Do They Get, and Why?; 6 Children in an Adult World; 7 Putting the Genie Back in the Bottle: Lessons for Policy; Appendix: Research Methods; Notes; Index; About the Author
Summary: 2007 Ruth Shonle Cavan Young Scholar Award presented by the American Society of Criminology. 2007 American Society of Criminology Michael J. Hindelang Award for the Most Outstanding Contribution to Research in Criminology. By comparing how adolescents are prosecuted and punished in juvenile and criminal (adult) courts, Aaron Kupchik finds that prosecuting adolescents in criminal court does not fit with our cultural understandings of youthfulness. As a result, adolescents who are transferred to criminal courts are still judged as juveniles. Ultimately, Kupchik makes a compelling argument for th
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HV9104 .K87 2006 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=865628 Available EBL865628

Contents; Acknowledgments; 1 Introduction: Growing Up Quickly; 2 Law and Context; 3 The Process of Prosecuting Adolescents: How Formal?; 4 Judging Adolescents: What Matters?; 5 Punishment for Adolescents:What Do They Get, and Why?; 6 Children in an Adult World; 7 Putting the Genie Back in the Bottle: Lessons for Policy; Appendix: Research Methods; Notes; Index; About the Author

2007 Ruth Shonle Cavan Young Scholar Award presented by the American Society of Criminology. 2007 American Society of Criminology Michael J. Hindelang Award for the Most Outstanding Contribution to Research in Criminology. By comparing how adolescents are prosecuted and punished in juvenile and criminal (adult) courts, Aaron Kupchik finds that prosecuting adolescents in criminal court does not fit with our cultural understandings of youthfulness. As a result, adolescents who are transferred to criminal courts are still judged as juveniles. Ultimately, Kupchik makes a compelling argument for th

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Kupchik (Univ. of Delaware) provides a compelling, detailed report of the handling of juvenile offenders, comparing the justice systems in the states of New York and New Jersey. New York has toughened its laws on juvenile offenders, making it much easier to try and transfer juveniles to criminal court. New Jersey has maintained a more traditional juvenile justice system aimed substantially at rehabilitation even for more serious juvenile offenses, though it has toughened delinquency sentencing and jurisdictional transfer provisions. These two state systems allow Kupchik to compare the processing and outcomes of juvenile offenders who have committed similar offenses but are handled in different kinds of systems. As society is beginning to understand, this "get tough" treatment of juvenile offenders does not work and is counterproductive. The data is limited to two northeastern jurisdictions, which may be very different from other regions. Noting this limitation, this volume is still an excellent book for those exploring the juvenile justice system, and an easy read for the general public. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels. G. C. Leavitt Idaho State University

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