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Battle Cries : Black Women and Intimate Partner Abuse

By: Potter, Hillary.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : NYU Press, 2009Edition: 1.Description: 1 online resource (286 p.).ISBN: 9780814768471.Subject(s): Abused women -- United States -- Case studies | African American women -- Abuse of -- Case studies | Intimate partner violence -- United States -- Case studiesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Battle Cries : Black Women and Intimate Partner AbuseDDC classification: 362.82/9208996073 | 362.829208996073 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; 1 Introduction: The Call; 2 Black Feminist Criminology and the Power of Narrative: "I Just Wanted to Tell My Story"; 3 Dynamic Resistance: "I'm a Strong Black Woman"; 4 Surviving Childhood: "I Learned to Stand up for Myself "; 5 Living Through It: "He Made Me Believe He Was Something He Wasn't"; 6 Fighting Back: "You Want to Fight? We Gonna Fight!"; 7 Getting Out: "We Have to Pray to God and Hope Everything Works Out"; 8 Conclusion: The Response; Appendix A: Research Methods and Demographics; Appendix B: Pseudonyms and Demographic Information; Notes; Bibliography
IndexA; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z; About the Author
Summary: Contrary to the stereotype of the "strong Black woman," African American women are more plagued by domestic violence than any other racial group in the United States. In fact, African American women experience intimate partner violence at a rate 35% higher than white women and about two and a half times more than women of other races and ethnicities. This common portrayal can hinder black women seeking help and support simply because those on the outside don''t think help is needed. Yet, as Hillary Potter argues in Battle Cries: Black Women and Intimate Partner Abuse , this stereotype often helps these African American women to resist and to verbally and physically retaliate against their abusers. Thanks to this generalization, Potter observes, black women are less inclined to label themselves as "victims" and more inclined to fight back. Battle Cries is an eye-opening examination of African American women''s experiences with intimate partner abuse, the methods used to contend with abusive mates, and the immediate and enduring consequences resulting from the maltreatment. Based on intensive interviews with 40 African American women abused by their male partners, Potter''s analysis takes into account variations in their experiences based on socioeconomic class, education level, and age, and discusses the common abuses and perceptions they share. Combining her remarkable findings with black feminist thought and critical race theory, Potter offers a unique and significant window through which we can better understand this understudied though rampant social problem.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HV6626.2 .P68 2008 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=865807 Available EBL865807

Contents; Acknowledgments; 1 Introduction: The Call; 2 Black Feminist Criminology and the Power of Narrative: "I Just Wanted to Tell My Story"; 3 Dynamic Resistance: "I'm a Strong Black Woman"; 4 Surviving Childhood: "I Learned to Stand up for Myself "; 5 Living Through It: "He Made Me Believe He Was Something He Wasn't"; 6 Fighting Back: "You Want to Fight? We Gonna Fight!"; 7 Getting Out: "We Have to Pray to God and Hope Everything Works Out"; 8 Conclusion: The Response; Appendix A: Research Methods and Demographics; Appendix B: Pseudonyms and Demographic Information; Notes; Bibliography

IndexA; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z; About the Author

Contrary to the stereotype of the "strong Black woman," African American women are more plagued by domestic violence than any other racial group in the United States. In fact, African American women experience intimate partner violence at a rate 35% higher than white women and about two and a half times more than women of other races and ethnicities. This common portrayal can hinder black women seeking help and support simply because those on the outside don''t think help is needed. Yet, as Hillary Potter argues in Battle Cries: Black Women and Intimate Partner Abuse , this stereotype often helps these African American women to resist and to verbally and physically retaliate against their abusers. Thanks to this generalization, Potter observes, black women are less inclined to label themselves as "victims" and more inclined to fight back. Battle Cries is an eye-opening examination of African American women''s experiences with intimate partner abuse, the methods used to contend with abusive mates, and the immediate and enduring consequences resulting from the maltreatment. Based on intensive interviews with 40 African American women abused by their male partners, Potter''s analysis takes into account variations in their experiences based on socioeconomic class, education level, and age, and discusses the common abuses and perceptions they share. Combining her remarkable findings with black feminist thought and critical race theory, Potter offers a unique and significant window through which we can better understand this understudied though rampant social problem.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In Denver in 2003, Potter (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder) conducted intensive interviews with 40 black women who had been abused by one or more of their husbands or boyfriends. In her illuminating and conceptually innovative book, Potter views her rich data through the lens of black feminist criminology. She vividly presents the women's backgrounds, their experiences living through abuse, and their efforts to fight back and get out. Potter characterizes the women as "dynamic resisters" rather than victims or survivors. She encourages readers to hear the "battle cries" of women besieged at home, in the workplace, in communities and congregations, and by systemic and sociocultural forces of gender, race, and class. In Potter's skilled hands, these women's stories counter stereotypes, show how serious partner-perpetrated abuse is in the lives and communities of black women, and draw attention to the ways race and class shape partner-perpetrated violence against women and social responses to it. She documents black women's lives and voices, augments critical theoretical perspectives, and recommends practical responses. Her contributions complement life history/interview studies by Dana-Ain Davis, Gail Garfield, Ann Goetting, Jody Raphael, Beth Richie, and Elaine Weiss. Read, listen, and learn. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. L. D. Brush University of Pittsburgh

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