Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Their solitary way : the Puritan social ethic in the first century of settlement in New England / by Stephen Foster.

By: Foster, Stephen, 1942-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Yale historical publications. Miscellany: 94.Publisher: New Haven : Yale University Press, c1971Description: xxii, 214 p. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 0300014082; 9780300014082.Subject(s): Puritans -- New England | Social ethicsDDC classification: 241/.04/59 | 917.4/03 Other classification: 11.62 | BO 6530 | HS 1721
Contents:
Appendix: The Massachusetts franchise in the seventeenth century ; The Nominiation of Massachusetts magistrates under the old charter ; The merchants, the moderates, and Edward Randolph ; Family connections of merchants, ministers, and magistrates.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
F7 .F76 1971 (Browse shelf) Available 0000101056059

Revision of the author's thesis, Yale, 1966.

Bibliography: p. 191-208.

Appendix: The Massachusetts franchise in the seventeenth century ; The Nominiation of Massachusetts magistrates under the old charter ; The merchants, the moderates, and Edward Randolph ; Family connections of merchants, ministers, and magistrates.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Born in Lawrenceville, Pennsylvania, Stephen Foster became a well-known American composer of many popular songs that are still sung and enjoyed today. As a child, Foster learned to play the flute. At the age of 18, he published his first song, "Open Thy Lattice, Love." In 1846 Foster moved to Cincinnati to work as an accountant for one of his brothers. <p> During his career, Foster wrote 189 songs, to most of which he wrote both the words and the music. Among his most notable songs are "Old Folks at Home" (or "Swanee Ribber," as it was commonly called), "O Susanna," "My Old Kentucky Home," and "Jeanie with the Light Brown Hair." "Beautiful Dreamer" was the last song he wrote. Foster finished the composition only a few days before his death. <p> Foster's music was greatly influenced by black minstrel shows. The gentleness of many of Foster's songs was not characteristic of his life. He was constantly in need of money, his marriage was most unhappy, and he died penniless in New York's Bellevue Hospital. <p> Foster's fame lives on today. Hundreds of reprints of Foster's songs are available, almost all of which have "improved" arrangements. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.