Indigenous Black Theology : Toward an African-Centered Theology of the African-American Religious Experience

By: Clark, Jawanza EricMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandBlack Religion/Womanist Thought/Social Justice: Publisher: New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012Description: 1 online resource (205 p.)ISBN: 9781137002839Subject(s): Africa - Religion | African Americans - Religion | Black theologyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Indigenous Black Theology : Toward an African-Centered Theology of the African-American Religious ExperienceDDC classification: 230.089/96073 | 230.08996073 LOC classification: BR563.N4 C53 2012Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; Series Editors' Preface; Author's Preface; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 "I Once Was Lost, But Now I'm Found": The Origins of Black Christian Anti-African Sentiment; 2 The Only Way to Salvation: A Christological Critique; 3 Overcoming Religious and Cultural Amnesia: Who Are the Ancestors?; 4 Indigenous Black Theology: Toward a Theology of the Ancestors; 5 The Dead Are Not Dead: The Future of Black Theology and Black Church Theologies; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: This work is concerned with the way Black Christian formation, because of the acceptance of universal, absolute, and exclusive Christian doctrines, seems to justify and even encourage anti-African sentiment.
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BR563.N4 C53 2012 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1058207 Available EBL1058207

Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; Series Editors' Preface; Author's Preface; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 "I Once Was Lost, But Now I'm Found": The Origins of Black Christian Anti-African Sentiment; 2 The Only Way to Salvation: A Christological Critique; 3 Overcoming Religious and Cultural Amnesia: Who Are the Ancestors?; 4 Indigenous Black Theology: Toward a Theology of the Ancestors; 5 The Dead Are Not Dead: The Future of Black Theology and Black Church Theologies; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index

This work is concerned with the way Black Christian formation, because of the acceptance of universal, absolute, and exclusive Christian doctrines, seems to justify and even encourage anti-African sentiment.

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

JAWANZA ERIC CLARK is Assistant Professor of Global Christianity at Manhattan College, USA.

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