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Trying Biology : The Scopes Trial, Textbooks, and the Antievolution Movement in American Schools

By: Shapiro, Adam R.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource (200 p.).ISBN: 9780226029597.Subject(s): Biology -- United States -- Textbooks -- History | Biology publishing -- United States -- History | Evolution (Biology) -- Study and teaching -- United States -- History | Religion and science -- United States -- History | Scopes, John Thomas -- Trials, litigation, etcGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Trying Biology : The Scopes Trial, Textbooks, and the Antievolution Movement in American SchoolsDDC classification: 576.8 LOC classification: QH362 .S53 2013Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Chapter One: Beyond Science and Religion: The Scopes Trial in Historical Context; Chapter Two: The Textbook Trust and State Adoption; Chapter Three: Textbooks and Their Makers: Authors, Editors, Salesmen, and Readers; Chapter Four: Civic Biology and the Origin of the Antievolution Movement; Chapter Five: How Scopes Was Framed; Chapter Six: The Evolution of the New Civic Biology; Chapter Seven: Biology Textbooks in an Era of Science and Religion; Chapter Eigh: Losing the Word: Measuring the Impact of Scopes; Acknowledgments; Notes; Index
Summary: In Trying Biology, Adam R. Shapiro convincingly dispels many conventional assumptions about the 1925 Scopes "monkey" trial. Most view it as an event driven primarily by a conflict between science and religion. Countering this, Shapiro shows the importance of timing: the Scopes trial occurred at a crucial moment in the history of biology textbook publishing, education reform in Tennessee, and progressive school reform across the country. He places the trial in this broad context-alongside American Protestant antievolution sentiment-and in doing so sheds new light on the trial and th
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QH362 .S53 2013 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1183986 Available EBL1183986
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QH361 .T73 2011 Transformations of Lamarckism : QH362 Teaching Evolution in a Creation Nation. QH362 .E852 2012 Evolution Challenges : QH362 .S53 2013 Trying Biology : QH363 Victorian Sensation : QH365 -- .O2 2008b On the Origin of Species. QH365 .D8 J64 2014 Darwin's Dice :

Contents; Chapter One: Beyond Science and Religion: The Scopes Trial in Historical Context; Chapter Two: The Textbook Trust and State Adoption; Chapter Three: Textbooks and Their Makers: Authors, Editors, Salesmen, and Readers; Chapter Four: Civic Biology and the Origin of the Antievolution Movement; Chapter Five: How Scopes Was Framed; Chapter Six: The Evolution of the New Civic Biology; Chapter Seven: Biology Textbooks in an Era of Science and Religion; Chapter Eigh: Losing the Word: Measuring the Impact of Scopes; Acknowledgments; Notes; Index

In Trying Biology, Adam R. Shapiro convincingly dispels many conventional assumptions about the 1925 Scopes "monkey" trial. Most view it as an event driven primarily by a conflict between science and religion. Countering this, Shapiro shows the importance of timing: the Scopes trial occurred at a crucial moment in the history of biology textbook publishing, education reform in Tennessee, and progressive school reform across the country. He places the trial in this broad context-alongside American Protestant antievolution sentiment-and in doing so sheds new light on the trial and th

Description based upon print version of record.

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CHOICE Review

This is a fascinating history, painstakingly documented and thought provoking. Trying Biology begins with a topic (the 1925 "Monkey Trial" in Dayton, Tennessee) that people think they know about, and weaves in several threads that change the color of that familiar fabric. As such, it is difficult to summarize succinctly. It is a story of how some familiar forces (anti-intellectualism, parochialism, greed, graft, and opportunism) combined with some forgotten forces (the civic biology movement, efforts to provide public education to all, and amoral textbook sales tactics) in 1925, producing a show trial as well as setting in motion some new social forces that still vex educators today. Shapiro (Birkbeck, Univ. of London, UK) makes a strong case that evolution per se was not the issue that forced this dramatic outcome; it depended on deeper-seated (and still powerful) resentments against government intrusion and expert opinions about pedagogy. Added to the narrative are some entertaining details about textbook sales agents, authors, and editors, which still have parallels in America today. In brief, readers of this book will learn a lot, not just about the trial but about the deep roots of social trends and public policies that still hold sway in 2013. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All academic, professional, and general audiences. D. A. Rintoul Kansas State University

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