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Business Ethics in the 21st Century.

By: Bowie, Norman.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Issues in Business Ethics / Eminent Voices in Business Ethics: Publisher: Dordrecht : Springer, 2013Description: 1 online resource (245 p.).ISBN: 9789400762237.Subject(s): Business ethics | Corporate culture -- Moral and ethical aspects | Leadership -- Moral and ethical aspects | Moral developmentGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Business Ethics in the 21st CenturyDDC classification: 174.4 | 174/.4 LOC classification: HF5387Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Business Ethics in the 21st Century; Introduction by the Series Editors; Preface; Editorial Board Issues in Business Ethics; Editorial Board Eminent Voices in Business Ethics; Contents; Part I: Economic Issues in Business Ethics; Chapter 1: Fair Markets Revisited; Morality as a Ground of Legal Decisions; A Rejoinder and Reply; Advice for Managers; Characteristics of Fairness; Objections and Replies; Conclusion; Chapter 2: What's Wrong with Efficiency and Always Low Prices; Introduction; The Problem; Some Observations from Home and Abroad; What Some Others Are Saying; The Issue or Issues
What's to Be DoneObjections and Replies; Conclusion; Chapter 3: Economics, Friend or Foe of Ethics; Economics as Foe; Foe: Adherence to Psychological Egoism; Foe: Assumptions of Agency Theory; Dropping the "No Transaction Costs" Assumption: Transaction Cost Economics; Turning Economics from Foe to Friend; Codes of Ethics; The Importance of a Good "Ethical Climate"; Multinationals and Universal Standards; The Argument for Universal Ethical Values; An Argument for Truly Universal Standards of Business Ethics; A Complication; Fairness as an Explanatory Variable in Economics and Management Theory
ConclusionPart II: Philosophical Issues in Business; Chapter 4: Kantian Themes; Why Kant; Organization of This Chapter; Rethinking and Defending Business Ethics : A Kantian Perspective; Chapter 1 Immoral Business Practices; Chapter 2 Treating the Humanity of Stakeholders as Ends Rather than as Means Merely; Chapter 3 The Firm as a Moral Community; Chapter 4 Acting from Duty: How Pure a Motive?; Chapter 5 The Cosmopolitan Perspective; The New Generation of Scholars Applying Kant to Business Ethics; Aristotle-Not Kant; Kantian Accounts of Corporate Social Responsibility; Conclusion
Chapter 5: Limitations of the Pragmatist Approach to Business EthicsBackground; Rorty's Contingency, Irony, and Solidarity; Why Literature Misleads; Rorty's Address Before the Society for Business Ethics; The Pragmatism of Ed Freeman and Some of His Students; Should Stakeholder Theorists Adopt a Pragmatist Methodology?; Concluding Thought; Part III: International Issues in Business Ethics; Chapter 6: Varieties of Corporate Social Responsibility; The Maximization of Shareholder Wealth Capitalism-American Finance Based Capitalism; Corporate Social Responsibility as Charity
An Addendum to the Classical American View: Stakeholder CapitalismSocial Responsibility Under the Stakeholder Model; The European Sustainability Version of Capitalism; Philanthropy, the Safety Net, and Human Rights; The Business Case for Social Responsibility; Corporate Social Responsibility in Asia; Japan; India; China; Evidence That China Seems to Lack a Sense of Corporate Social Responsibility; Which Version of Corporate Social Responsibility Should a Country Adopt?; The Moral Argument for Sustainability; Why Philanthropy Is Not Enough
Does China Need Corporate Social Responsibility to Survive
Summary: This work provides a critical look at business practice in the early 21st century and suggests changes that are both practical and normatively superior. Several chapters present a reflection on business ethics from a societal or macro-organizational point of view. It makes a case for the economic and moral superiority of the sustainability capitalism of the European Union over the finance-based model of the United States. Most major themes in business ethics are covered and some new ones are introduced, including the topic of the right way to teach business ethics. The general approach adopted
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HF5387 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1316971 Available EBL1316971

Business Ethics in the 21st Century; Introduction by the Series Editors; Preface; Editorial Board Issues in Business Ethics; Editorial Board Eminent Voices in Business Ethics; Contents; Part I: Economic Issues in Business Ethics; Chapter 1: Fair Markets Revisited; Morality as a Ground of Legal Decisions; A Rejoinder and Reply; Advice for Managers; Characteristics of Fairness; Objections and Replies; Conclusion; Chapter 2: What's Wrong with Efficiency and Always Low Prices; Introduction; The Problem; Some Observations from Home and Abroad; What Some Others Are Saying; The Issue or Issues

What's to Be DoneObjections and Replies; Conclusion; Chapter 3: Economics, Friend or Foe of Ethics; Economics as Foe; Foe: Adherence to Psychological Egoism; Foe: Assumptions of Agency Theory; Dropping the "No Transaction Costs" Assumption: Transaction Cost Economics; Turning Economics from Foe to Friend; Codes of Ethics; The Importance of a Good "Ethical Climate"; Multinationals and Universal Standards; The Argument for Universal Ethical Values; An Argument for Truly Universal Standards of Business Ethics; A Complication; Fairness as an Explanatory Variable in Economics and Management Theory

ConclusionPart II: Philosophical Issues in Business; Chapter 4: Kantian Themes; Why Kant; Organization of This Chapter; Rethinking and Defending Business Ethics : A Kantian Perspective; Chapter 1 Immoral Business Practices; Chapter 2 Treating the Humanity of Stakeholders as Ends Rather than as Means Merely; Chapter 3 The Firm as a Moral Community; Chapter 4 Acting from Duty: How Pure a Motive?; Chapter 5 The Cosmopolitan Perspective; The New Generation of Scholars Applying Kant to Business Ethics; Aristotle-Not Kant; Kantian Accounts of Corporate Social Responsibility; Conclusion

Chapter 5: Limitations of the Pragmatist Approach to Business EthicsBackground; Rorty's Contingency, Irony, and Solidarity; Why Literature Misleads; Rorty's Address Before the Society for Business Ethics; The Pragmatism of Ed Freeman and Some of His Students; Should Stakeholder Theorists Adopt a Pragmatist Methodology?; Concluding Thought; Part III: International Issues in Business Ethics; Chapter 6: Varieties of Corporate Social Responsibility; The Maximization of Shareholder Wealth Capitalism-American Finance Based Capitalism; Corporate Social Responsibility as Charity

An Addendum to the Classical American View: Stakeholder CapitalismSocial Responsibility Under the Stakeholder Model; The European Sustainability Version of Capitalism; Philanthropy, the Safety Net, and Human Rights; The Business Case for Social Responsibility; Corporate Social Responsibility in Asia; Japan; India; China; Evidence That China Seems to Lack a Sense of Corporate Social Responsibility; Which Version of Corporate Social Responsibility Should a Country Adopt?; The Moral Argument for Sustainability; Why Philanthropy Is Not Enough

Does China Need Corporate Social Responsibility to Survive

This work provides a critical look at business practice in the early 21st century and suggests changes that are both practical and normatively superior. Several chapters present a reflection on business ethics from a societal or macro-organizational point of view. It makes a case for the economic and moral superiority of the sustainability capitalism of the European Union over the finance-based model of the United States. Most major themes in business ethics are covered and some new ones are introduced, including the topic of the right way to teach business ethics. The general approach adopted

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

​ Norman E. Bowie is the former Elmer L Andersen Chair in Corporate Responsibility at the University of Minnesota. He has authored or edited 16 books and over 75 articles. Professor Bowie is the leading scholar in the application of Kant's moral philosophy to business. His book on that topic is Business Ethics: A Kantian Perspective and has been translated into Chinese and Japanese. His co-edited text Ethical Theory and Business is in the 9th edition. He has held a position as Dixons Professor of Business Ethics and Social Responsibility at the London Business School and been a fellow at Harvard's Program in Ethics and the Professions. He is past president of the Society for Business Ethics, the American Society for Value Inquiry and is past Executive Director of the American Philosophical Association. He is the former Associate Editor of Business Ethics Quarterly In August 2009 he received the first life time achievement award in scholarship present by the Society for Business Ethics. In 2012 a feschrift Kantian Business Ethics honoring his work was published by Edward Elgar

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