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Diagnosing Giants : Solving the Medical Mysteries of Thirteen Patients Who Changed the World

By: Mackowiak, Philip A.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, USA, 2013Description: 1 online resource (238 p.).ISBN: 9780199359226.Subject(s): Diagnosis | Disease | Famous persons | History of medicineGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Diagnosing Giants : Solving the Medical Mysteries of Thirteen Patients Who Changed the WorldDDC classification: 610.9 | 616.07 | 616.075 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Preface; Acknowledgments; 1. Mummy's Curse; 2. Last Repast; 3. Little Boots; 4. Noble Enemy; 5. "Interred at the Least Possible Expense"; 6. El Sordo; 7. A Medical Labyrinth; 8. Old Jack; 9. Mortal Wound; 10. Voyage to Invalidism; 11. Vessels of Stone; 12. Fatal Zest for Living; 13. "Too Busy to Be Sick"; EPILOGUE; ABOUT THE AUTHOR; INDEX; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; X; Z
Summary: Could Lincoln have lived? After John Wilkes Booth fired a low-velocity .44 caliber bullet into the back of the president's skull, Lincoln did not perish immediately. Attending doctors cleaned and probed the wound, and actually improved his breathing for a time. Today medical trauma teams help similar victims survive-including Gabby Giffords, whose injury was strikingly like Lincoln's. In Diagnosing Giants, Dr. Philip A. Mackowiak examines the historical record in detail, reconstructing Lincoln's last hours moment by moment to calculate the odds. That leads him to more questions: What if he had
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Cover; Contents; Preface; Acknowledgments; 1. Mummy's Curse; 2. Last Repast; 3. Little Boots; 4. Noble Enemy; 5. "Interred at the Least Possible Expense"; 6. El Sordo; 7. A Medical Labyrinth; 8. Old Jack; 9. Mortal Wound; 10. Voyage to Invalidism; 11. Vessels of Stone; 12. Fatal Zest for Living; 13. "Too Busy to Be Sick"; EPILOGUE; ABOUT THE AUTHOR; INDEX; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; X; Z

Could Lincoln have lived? After John Wilkes Booth fired a low-velocity .44 caliber bullet into the back of the president's skull, Lincoln did not perish immediately. Attending doctors cleaned and probed the wound, and actually improved his breathing for a time. Today medical trauma teams help similar victims survive-including Gabby Giffords, whose injury was strikingly like Lincoln's. In Diagnosing Giants, Dr. Philip A. Mackowiak examines the historical record in detail, reconstructing Lincoln's last hours moment by moment to calculate the odds. That leads him to more questions: What if he had

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Was the Buddha's last meal deadly? What really happened to King Tut and Caligula, and why did Goya lose his hearing? This book seeks to deduce, using case studies, the cause of death of famous figures. It is an entertaining read in which Mackowiak (Sch. of Medicine, Univ. of Maryland) plays detective, looking for clues in letters, firsthand accounts, old autopsies, legends, and other available facts. Cause of death is determined with the power of hindsight and modern medical knowledge unavailable at the time of death. The life stories of the patients are brief but engaging and provide context while including previously suggested diagnoses. The chosen images work well to illustrate the arguments, and each case study has endnotes. This work is similar to the author's previous book Post-Mortem: Solving History's Great Mysteries. VERDICT Mackowiak offers many fascinating pieces of information that history buffs will enjoy, while mystery readers will be drawn in by the title's detective aspects. A fun read for those interested in medicine or medical history.-Susanne Caro, Univ. of -Montana Lib., Missoula (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

This historical pageant of retrospective diagnoses of 13 celebrity patients--from Tutankhamun to Eleanor Roosevelt--reminds readers that disease matters in history. As physicians know, common things happen commonly: tuberculosis, syphilis, atherosclerosis, mental illness, and ill-defined fevers wend their way through the centuries. Rarities such as paracoccidioidomycosis (Bolivar) and Chagas disease (Darwin) make cameo appearances in the account. Gunshot wounds claim two lives--no puzzle there. Mackowiak (Univ. of Maryland School of Medicine) poses several questions. Could today's trauma teams put Stonewall Jackson back in command? Probably. Would Lincoln survive with modern neurosurgery? Doubtful. If he had survived, would rehabilitation efforts have enabled him to lead the country again? No. The familiar details of Eleanor Roosevelt's death in 1962 from hematological disease, complicated by disseminated, drug-resistant tuberculosis belatedly diagnosed and arguably iatrogenic, receive a fresh analysis. The book ends with a riveting account of the futility of the prolonged, end-of-life interventions that left this compassionate woman to die in "continuous despair" The book's strengths are the close attention to historical context, careful sifting of conflicting evidence based on incomplete data, consideration of the logic and utility of disease concepts across cultures and centuries, and instructive speculation by a thoughtful, knowledgeable clinician-historian. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All academic, general, and professional audiences. S. W. Moss independent scholar

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Philip A. Mackowiak is Emeritus Professor of Medicine and Carolyn Frenkil and Selvin Passen History of Medicine Scholar-in-Residence at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland.

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