Colours of the Empire, The : Racialized Representations during Portuguese Colonialism

By: Matos, Patrícia Ferraz deMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandEuropean Anthropology in Translation: Publisher: New York : Berghahn Books, 2013Description: 1 online resource (302 p.)ISBN: 9780857457639Subject(s): Indigenous peoples -- Portuguese-speaking countries | Portugal -- Colonies -- History | Racism -- Portuguese-speaking countriesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Colours of the Empire, The : Racialized Representations during Portuguese ColonialismDDC classification: 325.3469 LOC classification: JV4227 .M37413 2012Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Tables and Illustrations; Acknowledgements; Acronyms and Abbreviations; Introduction; Chapter I - Origins of a Prejudice: The Roots of Racial Discrimination; Chapter II - Discourse, Images, Knowledge: The Place of the Colonies and Their Populations in the Portuguese Colonial Empire; Chapter III - Exhibiting the Empire, Imagining the Nation: Representations of the Colonies and the Overseas Portuguese in the Great Exhibitions; Conclusion; Appendix I - Film; Appendix II - Texts from the padrões of Portugal dos Pequenitos; Bibliography; Index
Summary: The Portuguese Colonial Empire established its base in Africa in the fifteenth century and would not be dissolved until 1975. This book investigates how the different populations under Portuguese rule were represented within the context of the Colonial Empire by examining the relationship between these representations and the meanings attached to the notion of 'race'. Colour, for example, an apparently objective criterion of classification, became a synonym or near-synonym for 'race', a more abstract notion for which attempts were made to establish scientific credibility. Through her analys
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JV4017 .E47 2015 Empire's end : JV4035 .G56 2020 The global Spanish empire : JV4227 Naked Tropics : JV4227 .M37413 2012 Colours of the Empire, The : JV4227 .M37413 2013 The colours of the empire : JV4260 .H385 2015 Administration and Taxation in Former Portuguese Africa. JV5227 | JV5227 .R43 2012 | JV5227.R43 2012 Reading Colonial Japan :

Contents; Tables and Illustrations; Acknowledgements; Acronyms and Abbreviations; Introduction; Chapter I - Origins of a Prejudice: The Roots of Racial Discrimination; Chapter II - Discourse, Images, Knowledge: The Place of the Colonies and Their Populations in the Portuguese Colonial Empire; Chapter III - Exhibiting the Empire, Imagining the Nation: Representations of the Colonies and the Overseas Portuguese in the Great Exhibitions; Conclusion; Appendix I - Film; Appendix II - Texts from the padrões of Portugal dos Pequenitos; Bibliography; Index

The Portuguese Colonial Empire established its base in Africa in the fifteenth century and would not be dissolved until 1975. This book investigates how the different populations under Portuguese rule were represented within the context of the Colonial Empire by examining the relationship between these representations and the meanings attached to the notion of 'race'. Colour, for example, an apparently objective criterion of classification, became a synonym or near-synonym for 'race', a more abstract notion for which attempts were made to establish scientific credibility. Through her analys

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Author notes provided by Syndetics

Patrícia Ferraz de Matos is an anthropologist whose work focuses on the history of Portuguese anthropology and Portuguese colonialism. She received the Victor de Sá Prize of Contemporary History 2005 from the Cultural Council of the University of Minho, Portugal, when this work was first published in Portuguese. Her doctoral thesis was devoted to analyzing the work of the Portuguese anthropologist Mendes Correia and the production of the Anthropology School of Porto. At present she is a post doctoral researcher in the Institute of Social Sciences at the University of Lisbon where she works on the international networks underlying the forging of scientific knowledge.

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