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German Student Movement and the Literary Imagination, The : Transnational Memories of Protest and Dissent

By: Rinner, Susanne.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Protest, Culture & Society: Publisher: New York : Berghahn Books, 2013Description: 1 online resource (180 p.).ISBN: 9780857457554.Subject(s): German fiction -- 20th century -- History and criticism | Literature and society -- Germany -- History -- 20th century | Social conflict in literature | Student movements in literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: German Student Movement and the Literary Imagination, The : Transnational Memories of Protest and DissentDDC classification: 833.910923 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The German Student Movement andthe Literary Imagination; Protest, Culture and Society; Contents; Acknowledgements; Introduction: Trans/National Memories of 1968; Chapter 1: Remember? 1968 in German Fiction; Chapter 2: Forget it? 1968 in East Germany; Chapter 3: Transatlantic Encounters between Germany and the United States as Intercultural Exchange and Generational Conflict; Chapter 4: Transnational Memories: 1968 and Turkish-German Authors; Conclusion: Continued Taboos, Confirmed Canons; Bibliography; Index
Summary: Through a close reading of novels by Ulrike Kolb, Irmtraud Morgner, Emine Sevgi Özdamar, Bernhard Schlink, Peter Schneider, and Uwe Timm, this book traces the cultural memory of the 1960s student movement in German fiction, revealing layers of remembering and forgetting that go beyond conventional boundaries of time and space. These novels engage this contestation by constructing a palimpsest of memories that reshape readers' understanding of the 1960s with respect to the end of the Cold War, the legacy of the Third Reich, and the Holocaust. Topographically, these novels refute assertions t
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PT772 .G384 2013 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1337714 Available EBL1337714

The German Student Movement andthe Literary Imagination; Protest, Culture and Society; Contents; Acknowledgements; Introduction: Trans/National Memories of 1968; Chapter 1: Remember? 1968 in German Fiction; Chapter 2: Forget it? 1968 in East Germany; Chapter 3: Transatlantic Encounters between Germany and the United States as Intercultural Exchange and Generational Conflict; Chapter 4: Transnational Memories: 1968 and Turkish-German Authors; Conclusion: Continued Taboos, Confirmed Canons; Bibliography; Index

Through a close reading of novels by Ulrike Kolb, Irmtraud Morgner, Emine Sevgi Özdamar, Bernhard Schlink, Peter Schneider, and Uwe Timm, this book traces the cultural memory of the 1960s student movement in German fiction, revealing layers of remembering and forgetting that go beyond conventional boundaries of time and space. These novels engage this contestation by constructing a palimpsest of memories that reshape readers' understanding of the 1960s with respect to the end of the Cold War, the legacy of the Third Reich, and the Holocaust. Topographically, these novels refute assertions t

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Although short-lived, the turbulent German student movement of late 1967 and 1968 was in many ways a milestone for the first postwar generation. It marked both a coming-of-age for those old enough to question the sins of the past, and a defining moment for what was yet to come. Connected to broader world events, including anti-Vietnam War protests, the Prague Spring, feminism, and student demonstrations in neighboring France, it was emblematic of social change sweeping much of the globe. In fiction, the student movement also played a role with writers such as Peter Schneider, Uwe Timm, and the late Bernward Vesper, who utilized the setting in some of their more poignant works. What Rinner (Univ. of North Carolina, Greensboro) reveals about the theme itself is perhaps more concise than original. She sees 1968 as a watershed year not only for the West but also the East, where a tarnished utopia provoked conflicted views about the success of contemporary socialism, and where native Germans along with recent waves of Gastarbeiter (foreign-born laborers) were drawn into the action. All of this is central to the insightful analysis Rinner provides in a brief, well-ordered text. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty. C. L. Dolmetsch Marshall University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Susanne Rinner is Assistant Professor of German Studies and regular program faculty in the Women's and Gender Studies Program at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Most recently, she edited a special issue of International Poetry Review focused on poetry written in German by bilingual and multicultural poets. She has published several articles on contemporary German literature and is working on a book-length study of intermediality and intertextuality in contemporary German culture.</p>

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