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Breadwinners : working women and economic independence, 1865-1920 / Lara Vapnek.

By: Vapnek, Lara, 1967-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Women in American history: Publisher: Urbana : University of Illinois Press, c2009Description: x, 216 p., [6] p. of plates : ill. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9780252076619 (pbk. : alk. paper); 0252076613.Subject(s): Women -- Employment -- United States -- History | Working class women -- United States -- HistoryDDC classification: 331.40973/09034
Contents:
The daily labor of our own hands -- Working girls and white slaves -- Gender, class, and consumption -- Solving the servant problem -- Democracy is only an aspiration.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HD6095 .V37 2009 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002152007

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The daily labor of our own hands -- Working girls and white slaves -- Gender, class, and consumption -- Solving the servant problem -- Democracy is only an aspiration.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Through an intriguing series of case studies, Vapnek (St. John's Univ.) sheds further light on the ways in which white working-class women sought to define themselves as economic citizens as industrialization intensified in America during the second half of the 19th century and into the early years of the 20th. Simultaneously, she also looks at some of the leading women's labor reformers, many of whom were middle- and upper-class women, thus allowing for a quite nuanced discussion of the impact of gender on the forging of class identities from the Gilded Age into the Progressive Era. Such is particularly the case in Vapnek's examination of the efforts of middle- and upper-class women to address the so-called "servant problem" through organizations such as the Domestic Reform League, an offshoot of the Women's Educational and Industrial Union in Boston. Also profiled are working-class women who were themselves labor reformers, such as Jennie Collins and Leonora O'Reilly. In profiling them, Vapnek further highlights the inherent class tensions among women labor reformers who came from often vastly different backgrounds. This well-researched, well-written monograph is a welcome addition to the existing literature. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduate students through researchers. K. B. Nutter SUNY Stony Brook

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Lara Vapnek is an assistant professor of history at St. John's University in Queens, New York.

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