Capitalism Takes Command : The Social Transformation of Nineteenth-Century America

By: Zakim, MichaelContributor(s): Kornblith, Gary JMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2011Description: 1 online resource (368 p.)ISBN: 9780226977997Subject(s): Capitalism -- Social aspects -- United States | Capitalism -- United States -- History -- 19th century | United States -- Economic conditions -- 19th century | United States -- Social conditions -- 19th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Capitalism Takes Command : The Social Transformation of Nineteenth-Century AmericaDDC classification: 330.973/05 | 973.5 LOC classification: HC105HC105 .C24 2012HC105.C24 2012Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Editors' Acknowledgments; Introduction: An American Revolutionary Tradition; 1. The Agrarian Context of American Capitalist Development; 2. The Mortgage Worked the Hardest: The Fate of Landed Independence in Nineteenth-Century America; 3. Toxic Debt, Liar Loans, Collateralized and Securitized Human Beings, and the Panic of 1837; 4. Inheriting Property and Debt: From Family Security to Corporate Accumulation; 5. Slave Breeding and Free Love: An Antebellum Argument over Slavery, Capitalism, and Personhood; 6. Capitalism and the Rise of the Corporation Nation
7. Capitalist Aesthetics: Americans Look at the London and Liverpool Docks8. William Leggett and the Melodrama of the Market; 9. Producing Capitalism: The Clerk at Work; 10. Soulless Monsters and Iron Horses: The Civil War, Institutional Change, and American Capitalism; Afterword: Anonymous History; Contributors; Notes; Index
Summary: Most scholarship on nineteenth-century America's transformation into a market society has focused on consumption, romanticized visions of workers, and analysis of firms and factories. Building on but moving past these studies, Capitalism Takes Command presents a history of family farming, general incorporation laws, mortgage payments, inheritance practices, office systems, and risk management-an inventory of the means by which capitalism became America's new revolutionary tradition.This multidisciplinary collection of essays argues not only that capitalism reached far beyond
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Contents; Editors' Acknowledgments; Introduction: An American Revolutionary Tradition; 1. The Agrarian Context of American Capitalist Development; 2. The Mortgage Worked the Hardest: The Fate of Landed Independence in Nineteenth-Century America; 3. Toxic Debt, Liar Loans, Collateralized and Securitized Human Beings, and the Panic of 1837; 4. Inheriting Property and Debt: From Family Security to Corporate Accumulation; 5. Slave Breeding and Free Love: An Antebellum Argument over Slavery, Capitalism, and Personhood; 6. Capitalism and the Rise of the Corporation Nation

7. Capitalist Aesthetics: Americans Look at the London and Liverpool Docks8. William Leggett and the Melodrama of the Market; 9. Producing Capitalism: The Clerk at Work; 10. Soulless Monsters and Iron Horses: The Civil War, Institutional Change, and American Capitalism; Afterword: Anonymous History; Contributors; Notes; Index

Most scholarship on nineteenth-century America's transformation into a market society has focused on consumption, romanticized visions of workers, and analysis of firms and factories. Building on but moving past these studies, Capitalism Takes Command presents a history of family farming, general incorporation laws, mortgage payments, inheritance practices, office systems, and risk management-an inventory of the means by which capitalism became America's new revolutionary tradition.This multidisciplinary collection of essays argues not only that capitalism reached far beyond

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This instructive scholarly volume provides an overview of America's decades-long transition from its rural-based origins to a more capitalistically based society that in turn helped define a nation economically and culturally. Building on a number of relevant and informative topics, this collection demonstrates how capitalism describes a socioeconomic system with diverse individual and institutional consequences that can be mundane, profound, and pervasive. Editors Zakim (history, Tel Aviv Univ.) and Kornblith (history, Oberlin College) strive to incorporate economic changes into the context of social and cultural change and in so doing provide an appreciation of the significance and implications of historical change. Contributors cover a wide and complicated swath of 19th-century American economic and social history by analyzing such diverse topics as land holdings and family farms, mortgages and debt, slavery, inheritance, business incorporation, financial panics, merchant clerks, and capitalist aesthetics. Over time, the transcendence of capitalism on American society and culture revealed consequences that were not inevitable but nevertheless revolutionary. Beyond the more direct effects that mechanization had on emerging social and economic interaction, capitalism fostered a system that continues to define our humanity and our world. An interesting history that will benefit academic and research audiences. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-level undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and researchers. T. E. Sullivan Towson University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Michael Zakim is associate professor of history at Tel Aviv University. He is the author of Ready-Made Democracy: A History of Men's Dress in the American Republic, 1760-1860 , also published by the University of Chicago Press. Gary J. Kornblith is professor of history at Oberlin College and the author of Slavery and Sectional Strife in the Early American Republic, 1776-1821 .

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