Remaking Modernity : Politics, History, and Sociology

By: Adams, JuliaContributor(s): Clemens, Elisabeth | Orloff, Ann Shola | Steinmetz, GeorgeMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPolitics, History, and Culture: Publisher: Durham : Duke University Press, 2005Description: 1 online resource (628 p.)ISBN: 9780822385882Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Remaking Modernity : Politics, History, and SociologyDDC classification: 301/.09 LOC classification: HM487HM487.R46 2004Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Social Theory, Modernity, and the Three Waves of Historical Sociology; Part I Historical Sociology and EpistemologicalUnderpinnings; The Action Turn? Comparative-Historical Inquirybeyond the Classical Models of Conduct; Overlapping Territories and Intertwined Histories:Historical Sociology's Global Imagination; The Epistemological Unconscious of U.S.Sociology and the Transition to Post-Fordism:The Case of Historical Sociology; Part II State Formation and Historical Sociology
The Return of the Repressed: Religion and thePolitical Unconscious of Historical SociologySocial Provision and Regulation:Theories of States, Social Policies, and Modernity; The Bureaucratization of States:Toward an Analytical Weberianism; Part III History and Political Contention; Mars Revealed: The Entry of Ordinary Peopleinto War among States; Revolutions as Pathways to Modernity; Part IV Capitalism, Modernity, and the Economic Realm; Historical Sociology and Collective Action; Historical Sociology and the Economy: Actors, Networks,and Context; The Great Debates: Transitions to Capitalisms
The Professions: Prodigal Daughters of ModernityPart V Politics, History, and Collective Identities; Nations; Citizenship Troubles: Genealogies of Strugglefor the Soul of the Social; Ethnicity without Groups; Afterword: Logics of History? Agency, Multiplicity,and Incoherence in the Explanation of Change; References; Contributors; Index
Summary: A sociology collection reviewing the state-of-historical-study in a wide range of areas while showcasing the use of poststructuralist approaches to studying family, gender, war, protest & revolution, state-making, social provisions, colonialism, trans
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Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Social Theory, Modernity, and the Three Waves of Historical Sociology; Part I Historical Sociology and EpistemologicalUnderpinnings; The Action Turn? Comparative-Historical Inquirybeyond the Classical Models of Conduct; Overlapping Territories and Intertwined Histories:Historical Sociology's Global Imagination; The Epistemological Unconscious of U.S.Sociology and the Transition to Post-Fordism:The Case of Historical Sociology; Part II State Formation and Historical Sociology

The Return of the Repressed: Religion and thePolitical Unconscious of Historical SociologySocial Provision and Regulation:Theories of States, Social Policies, and Modernity; The Bureaucratization of States:Toward an Analytical Weberianism; Part III History and Political Contention; Mars Revealed: The Entry of Ordinary Peopleinto War among States; Revolutions as Pathways to Modernity; Part IV Capitalism, Modernity, and the Economic Realm; Historical Sociology and Collective Action; Historical Sociology and the Economy: Actors, Networks,and Context; The Great Debates: Transitions to Capitalisms

The Professions: Prodigal Daughters of ModernityPart V Politics, History, and Collective Identities; Nations; Citizenship Troubles: Genealogies of Strugglefor the Soul of the Social; Ethnicity without Groups; Afterword: Logics of History? Agency, Multiplicity,and Incoherence in the Explanation of Change; References; Contributors; Index

A sociology collection reviewing the state-of-historical-study in a wide range of areas while showcasing the use of poststructuralist approaches to studying family, gender, war, protest & revolution, state-making, social provisions, colonialism, trans

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In many ways, sociology was founded as a type of theoretically informed history. As sociology has become more social problem and policy centered over the years, historical approaches have often taken a back seat to more "presentist" viewpoints. Adams (Yale Univ.), Clemens (Univ. of Chicago), and Orloff (Northwestern Univ.) want to take stock of the accomplishments of historical sociology and offer some examples of its new ways of thinking about the present and the past. To do so, they have compiled an important, if uneven, collection of articles on the current state of historical sociology. The editors wish to situate the contributions around whether or not modernity has outlived its usefulness as an explanatory concept in historical sociology. Although some of the articles fail to directly connect with this theme, most exhibit a tendency to question or reconfigure many of the basic assumptions handed down from the past two waves of historical sociologists. This collection may not convince other sociologists of the necessity of incorporating historical approaches into their work, but it does provide an important indicator of the type of issues that historically oriented sociologists will be addressing over the next few decades. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates, graduate students, researchers/faculty. S. C. Ward Western Connecticut State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Julia Adams is Professor of Sociology at Yale University. She is the author of The Familial State: Ruling Families and Merchant Capitalism in Early Modern Europe .

Elisabeth Clemens is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Chicago. She is the author of The People's Lobby: Organizational Innovation and the Rise of the Interest Group .

Ann Shola Orloff is Professor of Sociology at Northwestern University. Her most recent book is States, Markets, Families: Gender, Social Policy, and Liberalism in Australia, Canada, Great Britain, and the United States (with Julia O'Connor and Sheila Shaver).

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