The Emergence of African American Literacy Traditions : Family and Community Efforts in the Nineteenth Century

By: BELT-BEYAN, PHYLLISMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Santa Barbara : ABC-CLIO, 2004Description: 1 online resource (224 p.)ISBN: 9780313053108Subject(s): African Americans -- Books and reading -- History -- 19th century | African Americans -- Education -- History -- 19th century | African Americans -- Social conditions -- 19th century | Literacy -- United States -- History -- 19th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Emergence of African American Literacy Traditions : Family and Community Efforts in the Nineteenth CenturyDDC classification: 371 | 371.829 | 371.829/96073/09034 LOC classification: LC2741 .B45 2004Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Foreword; Acknowledgments; 1. Emergent African American Literacy Traditions: Theoretical and Conceptual Frameworks; 2. Family; 3. Visible and Invisible Institutions; 4. Community; 5. Conclusions; References; Index
Summary: The ways in which the African American community learned to be proficient readers and writers during the 19th century were diverse, however, the greatest impact on literacy acquisition came from family and community efforts. African American arts, churches, benevolent societies, newspapers, literacy societies, and formal and informal schools supported literacy growth, and literacy growth in turn gave rise to national and international African American literacy traditions. The underlying motivations that gave shape to the nature of their literacy behaviors and events within family and community
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LC2741 .B45 2004 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=496909 Available EBL496909

Contents; Foreword; Acknowledgments; 1. Emergent African American Literacy Traditions: Theoretical and Conceptual Frameworks; 2. Family; 3. Visible and Invisible Institutions; 4. Community; 5. Conclusions; References; Index

The ways in which the African American community learned to be proficient readers and writers during the 19th century were diverse, however, the greatest impact on literacy acquisition came from family and community efforts. African American arts, churches, benevolent societies, newspapers, literacy societies, and formal and informal schools supported literacy growth, and literacy growth in turn gave rise to national and international African American literacy traditions. The underlying motivations that gave shape to the nature of their literacy behaviors and events within family and community

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

PHYLLIS M. BELT-BEYAN is Assistant Professor of Literacy Research and Education at Western Michigan University.

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