Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Crossing the pond : the native American effort in World War II / Jere Bishop Franco.

By: Franco, Jere Bishop, 1948-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: War and the Southwest series: no. 7.Publisher: Denton, Tex. : University of North Texas Press, 1999Edition: 1st ed.Description: xvii, 232 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 1574410652; 9781574410655.Subject(s): World War, 1939-1945 -- Participation, Indian | Indians of North America -- History -- 20th century
Contents:
The swastika shadow over Native America: John Collier and the AIF -- Bringing them in alive: selective service and Native Americans -- The return of the Native: American Indian laborers -- The great give-away: tribal resources -- Publicity, persuasion, and propaganda: stereotyping the Native American -- Across the blue waters: the Santa Fe Indian club -- Empowering the veteran: postwar civil rights.
Review: ""Crossing the Pond" is a term Native Americans used to describe the process of being transferred overseas for military duty. This was both an event and a duty taken quite seriously by tribal members, who participated in every aspect of wartime America. On the homefront, Native Americans gave comparable and sometimes exemplary contributions to civilian defense work, Red Cross drives, and war bond purchases."--BOOK JACKET.Summary: "Crossing the Pond also chronicles the unsuccessful efforts of Nazi propagandists to exploit Native Americans for the Third Reich, as well as the successful efforts of the United States government and the media to recruit Native Americans, utilize their resources, and publicize their activities for the war effort. Attention is also given to the postwar experiences of Native American men and women as they sought the franchise, educational equality, economic stability, the right to purchase alcohol, and the same amount of respect given to other American war veterans."--BOOK JACKET.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D810.I5 F73 1999 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002190981

Includes bibliographical references (p. 209-217) and index.

The swastika shadow over Native America: John Collier and the AIF -- Bringing them in alive: selective service and Native Americans -- The return of the Native: American Indian laborers -- The great give-away: tribal resources -- Publicity, persuasion, and propaganda: stereotyping the Native American -- Across the blue waters: the Santa Fe Indian club -- Empowering the veteran: postwar civil rights.

""Crossing the Pond" is a term Native Americans used to describe the process of being transferred overseas for military duty. This was both an event and a duty taken quite seriously by tribal members, who participated in every aspect of wartime America. On the homefront, Native Americans gave comparable and sometimes exemplary contributions to civilian defense work, Red Cross drives, and war bond purchases."--BOOK JACKET.

"Crossing the Pond also chronicles the unsuccessful efforts of Nazi propagandists to exploit Native Americans for the Third Reich, as well as the successful efforts of the United States government and the media to recruit Native Americans, utilize their resources, and publicize their activities for the war effort. Attention is also given to the postwar experiences of Native American men and women as they sought the franchise, educational equality, economic stability, the right to purchase alcohol, and the same amount of respect given to other American war veterans."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

"Crossing the Pond" was a term Native Americans used to describe the process of being transferred overseas for military duty in WW II. Franco aptly uses this title to describe how that war affected Native Americans. She deals very little with traditional compartmentalized categories of Native American history, e.g., federal policy, Indian/white relations, and white viewpoints of Indians. Rather, her work concentrates on the reciprocal relationship between Native Americans and whites when they confronted war as comrades and not as enemies, and she explores the ambivalence that occurs when a society suddenly realizes it is fighting with rather than against a particular group of people. Franco makes no attempt to describe military strategy, instead focusing on the apprehensive and complex attitudes that accompanied the outset of war. Like other historians who have studied ethnic issues, she convincingly argues that WW II had a more profound and lasting effect on the course of Native American affairs in this century than any other single event or period. Her sources include government documents, manuscripts, and oral histories as well as secondary works. Complements Alison Bernstein's American Indians and World War II: Toward a New Era in Indian Affairs (CH, Dec'91). Endnotes and photographs. General readers; upper-division undergraduates and above. R. E. Marcello University of North Texas

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Jeré Bishop Franco lived several years in Phoenix, Arizona. As an undergraduate and a counselor with the University of Texas at El Paso Upward Bound Program, she traveled to New Mexico and visited pueblo villages, reviving her interest in native cultures. She holds a Ph.D. from the University of Arizona and has taught as a part-time lecturer at the El Paso Community College and raised four children. She lives with her husband and youngest son in El Paso, Texas.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.