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Confederate Bushwhacker : Mark Twain in the Shadow of the Civil War

By: Loving, Jerome.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Lebanon : University Press of New England, 2013Description: 1 online resource (153 p.).ISBN: 9781611684728.Subject(s): Authors, American -- 19th century -- Biography | Grant, Ulysses S. -- (Ulysses Simpson), -- 1822-1885. -- Personal memoirs of U.S. Grant | Humorists, American -- 19th century -- Biography | Soldiers -- Confederate States of America -- Biography | Twain, Mark, -- 1835-1910 | Twain, Mark, -- 1835-1910. -- Private history of a campaign that failed | Veterans -- Confederate States of America -- BiographyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Confederate Bushwhacker : Mark Twain in the Shadow of the Civil WarDDC classification: 818/.409 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover Page -- Title Page -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- Introduction -- Prelude: "Mark Twain's War Experiences," New York Times, October 7, 1877 -- One: On the Eve of Huckleberry Finn -- Two: Skirting the Mason-Dixon -- Three: The Greatest General Who Ever Lived -- Four: March of the White Man -- Five: "The Private History of a Campaign That Failed" -- Six: The "Private" History and the "Personal" Memoir -- Seven: The Killing of Strangers -- Eight: Connecticut Yankee -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- Index
Summary: Confederate Bushwhacker is a microbiography set in the most important and pivotal year in the life of its subject. In 1885, Mark Twain was at the peak of his career as an author and a businessman, as his own publishing firm brought out not only the U.S. edition of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn but also the triumphantly successful Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant. Twenty years after the end of the Civil War, Twain finally tells the story of his past as a deserter from the losing side, while simultaneously befriending and publishing the general from the winning side. Coincidentally, the year als
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Cover Page -- Title Page -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- Introduction -- Prelude: "Mark Twain's War Experiences," New York Times, October 7, 1877 -- One: On the Eve of Huckleberry Finn -- Two: Skirting the Mason-Dixon -- Three: The Greatest General Who Ever Lived -- Four: March of the White Man -- Five: "The Private History of a Campaign That Failed" -- Six: The "Private" History and the "Personal" Memoir -- Seven: The Killing of Strangers -- Eight: Connecticut Yankee -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- Index

Confederate Bushwhacker is a microbiography set in the most important and pivotal year in the life of its subject. In 1885, Mark Twain was at the peak of his career as an author and a businessman, as his own publishing firm brought out not only the U.S. edition of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn but also the triumphantly successful Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant. Twenty years after the end of the Civil War, Twain finally tells the story of his past as a deserter from the losing side, while simultaneously befriending and publishing the general from the winning side. Coincidentally, the year als

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Loving's book is a lot more than the "microbiography" that the dust jacket claims. Loving crams a vast array of insights, thoughts, opinions, facts, and factoids into 1885--the year of Twain's life this book considers. Reprinted at the book's center is Twain's "Private History of a Campaign That Failed," with Loving pirouetting around it, elaborating Twain's doubts about the Confederacy; his lecturing career; Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, commonly ascribed to 1885; The Century Magazine's Civil War biographies and the "binding up of the nation's wounds"; the Paige typesetter, in which he was heavily invested. Joe Fulton's The Reconstruction of Mark Twain: How a Confederate Bushwhacker Became the Lincoln of Our Literature (CH, Jun'11, 48-5541) centers on the same experience, but Loving's organization is often surreal and impressionistic whereas Fulton's is lineal and carefully scholarly. Both are fascinating. Lurking behind Loving's extravaganza is the emergence of the vicious lynch law that pushed blacks into the nadir, and he pulls the curtain aside just enough to give the reader a chilly look into that ugly background reality. Where Fulton convincingly demonstrates the rationale for Twain's visionarily broadened tolerance, Loving asserts Twain's strategic avoidance of an American tragedy that is only too apparent in hindsight. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All readers. D. E. Sloane University of New Haven

Author notes provided by Syndetics

JEROME LOVING is Distinguished Professor of English at Texas A&M University, and author of biographies of Walt Whitman, Theodore Dreiser, and Mark Twain.

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