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Fatal Balancing Act, A : The Dilemma of the Reich Association of Jews in Germany, 1939-1945

By: Meyer, Beate.
Contributor(s): Templer, William.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : Berghahn Books, 2013Description: 1 online resource (453 p.).ISBN: 9781782380283.Subject(s): Germany -- Ethnic relations | Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945) -- Germany | Jews -- Germany -- History -- 1933-1945Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Fatal Balancing Act, A : The Dilemma of the Reich Association of Jews in Germany, 1939-1945DDC classification: 940.5318 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Tables; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; Introduction; Chapter 1-From ""Forced Emigration"" to Assisting with the Deportations; Chapter 2-Walking on a Thin Line: The Participation of the Reichsvereinigung and the Berlin Jewish Community during the Deportations; Chapter 3-The ""Psychological Environment"" in the Countryside: Latitude for Action by Jewish Functionaries in the District Branches; Chapter 4-The Residual Reichsvereinigung; Chapter 5-In the Wake: The ""Strategy of Cooperation"" as an Incriminating Burden; Conclusion; Bibliography; Index
Summary: In 1939 all German Jews had to become members of a newly founded Reich Association. The Jewish functionaries of this organization were faced with circumstances and events that forced them to walk a fine line between responsible action and collaboration. They had hoped to support mass emigration, mitigate the consequences of the anti-Jewish measures, and take care of the remaining community. When the Nazis forbade emigration and started mass deportations in 1941, the functionaries decided to cooperate to prevent the "worst." In choosing to cooperate, they came into direct opposition with the
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
DS134.255 .M493 2013 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1375248 Available EBL1375248

Contents; Tables; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; Introduction; Chapter 1-From ""Forced Emigration"" to Assisting with the Deportations; Chapter 2-Walking on a Thin Line: The Participation of the Reichsvereinigung and the Berlin Jewish Community during the Deportations; Chapter 3-The ""Psychological Environment"" in the Countryside: Latitude for Action by Jewish Functionaries in the District Branches; Chapter 4-The Residual Reichsvereinigung; Chapter 5-In the Wake: The ""Strategy of Cooperation"" as an Incriminating Burden; Conclusion; Bibliography; Index

In 1939 all German Jews had to become members of a newly founded Reich Association. The Jewish functionaries of this organization were faced with circumstances and events that forced them to walk a fine line between responsible action and collaboration. They had hoped to support mass emigration, mitigate the consequences of the anti-Jewish measures, and take care of the remaining community. When the Nazis forbade emigration and started mass deportations in 1941, the functionaries decided to cooperate to prevent the "worst." In choosing to cooperate, they came into direct opposition with the

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Within Nazi Germany, German Jews fell formally under the authority of the Reich Association (RV), which reported directly to the Reich Main Security Office (RSHA). Scrutinized in much the same fashion as Jewish Councils (Judenrat) in the ghettos, the Reich Association pursued various options to preserve German Jewry while adhering to guidelines defined by the RSHA. When emigration remained an option, the RV facilitated Jewish emigration to whichever country or region remained open to Jews. As Nazi policy moved toward deportations and extermination, the RV struggled case by case to reduce increasing economic and cultural destitution by funding improved living quarters, classrooms, and hospitals. Archival resources revealed more than a simple balancing act between the RV and RSHA. Regional offices faced diverse challenges from local Nazi party leaders as well as from the Gestapo. Options diminished as the war expanded. Any balancing act proved tenuous as costs vastly exceeded Jewish resources while international support withered. Heavily documented and researched, the book shows that the RV's limited successes must be balanced against the limitations imposed upon it. Although perhaps a difficult read for nonspecialists, the book fits in with recent trends to integrate the war into Nazi genocidal planning. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. D. A. Meier Dickinson State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Beate Meyer is a Senior Researcher at the Institute for the History of German Jews in Hamburg, Germany and is a lecturer in the Department of History at the University of Hamburg. She has been a Fellow at the International Institute of Holocaust Research in Yad Vashem/Jerusalem (2000/2001) and the USHMM (2010). Recent publications include Jews in Nazi Berlin: From Kristallnacht to Liberation (co-edited, University of Chicago Press 2009).</p>

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