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Curriculum Models for the 21st Century : Using Learning Technologies in Higher Education

By: Gosper, Maree.
Contributor(s): Ifenthaler, Dirk.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Dordrecht : Springer, 2013Description: 1 online resource (454 p.).ISBN: 9781461473664.Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Curriculum Models for the 21st Century : Using Learning Technologies in Higher EducationDDC classification: 378.199 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Preface; Contents; About the Authors; Reviewers; Chapter 1: Curriculum Design for the Twenty-First Century; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Engaging a Diverse Student Cohort; 1.3 Enabling Graduate Outcomes; 1.4 Facilitating Cognitive Processing; 1.5 Closing Comments; References; Part ITheoretical Consideration for the Twenty- First Century Curriculum; Chapter 2: Breaking Away from Text, Time and Place; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Rethinking Relationships: Trends and the Technological Change Continuum in Higher Education; 2.3 New Media Literacies; 2.4 Frameworks Moving Forward; References
Chapter 3: The Social Processes of Web 2.0 Collaboration: Towards a New Model for Virtual Learning3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Online Collaboration: Coordinating Technology and People; 3.3 Learning in a Network Environment; 3.4 Strategies for Collaborative Learning; 3.5 Supporting the Learning Needs of Communities of Learners; 3.6 Designing a Virtual Collaborative Learning Environment; 3.7 Curriculum Design as Applied to Virtual Collaborative Learning Practice; 3.8 Conclusion; References; Chapter 4: Open Educational Curricula Interpreted Through the Māori Concept of Ako; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Ako
4.3 Open4.4 Using Ako to Create a Philosophy for Open Curricula; 4.5 The Challenges of an Open Curriculum; 4.6 Conclusion; References; Part IICase Studies: Moving Beyond Traditional Practice; Chapter 5: Research-Based Learning: Connecting Research and Instruction; 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 Research-Based Learning; 5.2.1 Principles of RBL; 5.2.2 Typology of RBL; 5.3 Realising Research-Based Learning; 5.3.1 Setting; 5.3.2 RBL Curriculum Design and Realisation; 5.3.3 Course Evaluation; 5.4 Discussion; 5.5 Conclusion; References
Chapter 6: Personalized Engineering Education for the Twenty-First Century6.1 Frame of Reference; 6.2 Competencies and Meta-competencies for Twenty-First-Century Engineers; 6.3 An Educational Approach to Support Innovation in an Interconnected World; 6.3.1 Foundations of the Approach; 6.3.2 Implementation of the Approach; 6.3.2.1 The Question for the Semester; 6.3.2.2 Assignment 0; 6.3.2.3 Learning Essays; 6.3.2.4 Individual and Group Feedback; 6.3.2.5 Project: Answering the Question for the Semester; 6.3.2.6 A0-End of the Semester (A0-EOS) and Self-Grading
6.4 Implementation of the Approach in Different Settings6.4.1 Technology Enhances Mass Collaboration of Students in Distributed Settings; 6.4.2 Courses Jointly Offered Across Universities with Distance Learning Students; 6.4.2.1 Scaffolding the Team Using Individual, Group, and Team Assignments; 6.4.2.2 End-of-Semester Deliverables; 6.5 Closing Comments; References; Chapter 7: Creating Curriculum Within the Context of an Enterprise; 7.1 Introduction; 7.2 Curricular Models and Instructional Design Education; 7.2.1 Teaching Instructional Design; 7.2.2 Experiential Learning
7.2.3 Entrepreneurship in Education
Summary: Changing student profiles and the increasing availability of mainstream and specialized learning technologies are stretching the traditional face-to-face models of teaching and learning in higher education. Institutions, too, are facing far-reaching systemic changes which are placing strains on existing resources and physical infrastructure and calling into question traditional ways of teaching through lectures and tutorials. And, with an ever-increasing scrutiny on teaching and teachers' accountability for positive educational outcomes, the call for closer attention to learning, teaching and,
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http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1398428 Available EBL1398428

Preface; Contents; About the Authors; Reviewers; Chapter 1: Curriculum Design for the Twenty-First Century; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Engaging a Diverse Student Cohort; 1.3 Enabling Graduate Outcomes; 1.4 Facilitating Cognitive Processing; 1.5 Closing Comments; References; Part ITheoretical Consideration for the Twenty- First Century Curriculum; Chapter 2: Breaking Away from Text, Time and Place; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Rethinking Relationships: Trends and the Technological Change Continuum in Higher Education; 2.3 New Media Literacies; 2.4 Frameworks Moving Forward; References

Chapter 3: The Social Processes of Web 2.0 Collaboration: Towards a New Model for Virtual Learning3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Online Collaboration: Coordinating Technology and People; 3.3 Learning in a Network Environment; 3.4 Strategies for Collaborative Learning; 3.5 Supporting the Learning Needs of Communities of Learners; 3.6 Designing a Virtual Collaborative Learning Environment; 3.7 Curriculum Design as Applied to Virtual Collaborative Learning Practice; 3.8 Conclusion; References; Chapter 4: Open Educational Curricula Interpreted Through the Māori Concept of Ako; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Ako

4.3 Open4.4 Using Ako to Create a Philosophy for Open Curricula; 4.5 The Challenges of an Open Curriculum; 4.6 Conclusion; References; Part IICase Studies: Moving Beyond Traditional Practice; Chapter 5: Research-Based Learning: Connecting Research and Instruction; 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 Research-Based Learning; 5.2.1 Principles of RBL; 5.2.2 Typology of RBL; 5.3 Realising Research-Based Learning; 5.3.1 Setting; 5.3.2 RBL Curriculum Design and Realisation; 5.3.3 Course Evaluation; 5.4 Discussion; 5.5 Conclusion; References

Chapter 6: Personalized Engineering Education for the Twenty-First Century6.1 Frame of Reference; 6.2 Competencies and Meta-competencies for Twenty-First-Century Engineers; 6.3 An Educational Approach to Support Innovation in an Interconnected World; 6.3.1 Foundations of the Approach; 6.3.2 Implementation of the Approach; 6.3.2.1 The Question for the Semester; 6.3.2.2 Assignment 0; 6.3.2.3 Learning Essays; 6.3.2.4 Individual and Group Feedback; 6.3.2.5 Project: Answering the Question for the Semester; 6.3.2.6 A0-End of the Semester (A0-EOS) and Self-Grading

6.4 Implementation of the Approach in Different Settings6.4.1 Technology Enhances Mass Collaboration of Students in Distributed Settings; 6.4.2 Courses Jointly Offered Across Universities with Distance Learning Students; 6.4.2.1 Scaffolding the Team Using Individual, Group, and Team Assignments; 6.4.2.2 End-of-Semester Deliverables; 6.5 Closing Comments; References; Chapter 7: Creating Curriculum Within the Context of an Enterprise; 7.1 Introduction; 7.2 Curricular Models and Instructional Design Education; 7.2.1 Teaching Instructional Design; 7.2.2 Experiential Learning

7.2.3 Entrepreneurship in Education

Changing student profiles and the increasing availability of mainstream and specialized learning technologies are stretching the traditional face-to-face models of teaching and learning in higher education. Institutions, too, are facing far-reaching systemic changes which are placing strains on existing resources and physical infrastructure and calling into question traditional ways of teaching through lectures and tutorials. And, with an ever-increasing scrutiny on teaching and teachers' accountability for positive educational outcomes, the call for closer attention to learning, teaching and,

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Dr. Gosper is a teacher and researcher working in the area of professional and organisational development in universities. Her research interests encompass the development of expertise, integration of technologies into the curriculum, matching cognitive processes with the affordances of technologies, and the development of effective and sustainable learning environments. She developed the MAPLET Framework, for matching aims, processes, learner expertise and technologies which can be used as both a curriculum diagnostic and development tool. She was also led the development of the CICTO Framework for selecting software solutions for quality learning and sustainable practice based on interrelationships between the curriculum, information and communication technologies and the organizational environment.</p> <p>Dr. Ifenthaler's research interests focus on the learning-dependent progression of mental models, problem solving, decision making, situational awareness, game-based learning, and emotions. He developed an automated and computer-based methodology for the assessmentand analysis of graphical and natural language representations (SMD Technology, HIMAT, AKOVIA). Additionally, he developed components of course management software and an educational simulation games (DIVOSA, SEsim). He is also interested in the development of educational software and learning management systems (LMS).</p>

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