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Demand Fulfillment in Multi-Stage Customer Hierarchies.

By: Vogel, Sebastian.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Produktion und Logistik: Publisher: Dordrecht : Springer, 2013Edition: 1.Description: 1 online resource (392 p.).ISBN: 9783658028640.Subject(s): LiteratureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Demand Fulfillment in Multi-Stage Customer HierarchiesDDC classification: 658.5 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Foreword; Acknowledgments; Contents; List of Figures; List of Tables; List of Abbreviations; List of Symbols; 1. Introduction; 1.1. Motivating Case Study; 1.2. The Demand Fulfillment Problem in Multi-Stage Customer Hierarchies; 1.2.1. Heterogeneous Customer Segments; 1.2.2. Multi-Stage Customer Hierarchies; 1.2.3. Iterative Disaggregation and Allocation in Customer Hierarchies; 1.3. Problem Focus and Research Questions; 1.4. Overview of Approach; 2. Supply Chain Planning and Demand Fulfillment; 2.1. Supply Chain Planning; 2.1.1. Supply Chain Management; 2.1.2. Hierarchical Planning
2.1.3. Interrelations between Planning Tasks2.1.4. The Position of the Customer Order Decoupling Point; 2.1.5. Advanced Planning Systems; 2.2. Demand Planning; 2.2.1. Objectives and Planning Tasks; 2.2.2. Demand Planning Structures and Forecasting Hierarchies; 2.2.3. Demand Planning Processes and Forecasting Procedures; 2.2.4. Demand Planning Controlling and Forecast Error Measures; 2.2.5. Hierarchical Forecasting; 2.3. Master Planning; 2.3.1. Objectives and Planning Tasks; 2.3.2. Basic Master Planning Model; 2.4. Demand Fulfillment; 2.4.1. Objectives and Planning Tasks
2.4.2. Types of Demand Fulfillment Systems2.4.3. Basic Models for Demand Fulfillment; 2.4.4. State of the Art: Demand Fulfillment in MTS Environments; 2.5. Conclusions: Allocation Problems in Supply Chain Planning; 3. Multi-Stage Customer Hierarchies; 3.1. Formal Hierarchies; 3.1.1. Trees and Hierarchies; 3.1.2. Aggregation and Disaggregation; 3.2. Decision-Making in Hierarchies; 3.3. Customer Hierarchies and Hierarchical Sales Organizations; 3.3.1. Customer Segmentation and Customer Profitability; 3.3.2. A Formal Model of Customer Hierarchies; 3.3.3. Hierarchical Sales Organizations
3.3.4. Customer Hierarchies in the Context of the Schneeweiß Framework3.4. Forecast Misrepresentation in Customer Hierarchies; 3.4.1. Sales Forecasting and Agency Problems; 3.4.2. Compensation Schemes for Demand-Constrained Supply Chains; 3.4.3. Compensation Schemes for Supply-Constrained Supply Chains; 3.4.4. Forecast Misrepresentations: Empirical and Experimental Evidence; 3.4.5. Application to Customer Hierarchies; 3.5. Measures of Heterogeneity in Customer Hierarchies; 3.5.1. Inequality and Heterogeneity Measurement; 3.5.2. Standard Heterogeneity Measures
3.5.3. Generalized Entropy Inequality Measures and Theil's Index3.5.4. Comparison of Heterogeneity Measures; 4. Allocation Planning and Disaggregation in Customer Hierarchies; 4.1. Notation and Formal Model; 4.2. Existing Quantity-Based Allocation Schemes; 4.2.1. Type 1: Based on Demand, Pro Rata; 4.2.2. Type 2: Based on Another Key Figure, Pro Rata; 4.2.3. Type 3: Based on Demand, Disproportionally; 4.2.4. Type 4: Based on Another Key Figure, Disproportionally; 4.2.5. Stochastic or Unknown Supply Quantities; 4.3. Basic Profit-Based Allocation Schemes; 4.3.1. Optimal Central Allocation (OCA)
4.3.2. Optimal Decentral Allocation (ODA)
Summary: This book extends the existing demand fulfillment research by considering multi-stage customer hierarchies. Basis is a two-step allocation and consumption planning procedure. In the existing literature, it is assumed that the customer segments are 'flat'. This means they can be sorted easily during the allocation planning step by a single central planner in decreasing order of profitability. In the subsequent consumption planning phase, if order requests differ in terms of profit margins, companies can render prioritized service in real time to their most profitable customers by consuming the reserved quotas.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1398915 Available EBL1398915

Foreword; Acknowledgments; Contents; List of Figures; List of Tables; List of Abbreviations; List of Symbols; 1. Introduction; 1.1. Motivating Case Study; 1.2. The Demand Fulfillment Problem in Multi-Stage Customer Hierarchies; 1.2.1. Heterogeneous Customer Segments; 1.2.2. Multi-Stage Customer Hierarchies; 1.2.3. Iterative Disaggregation and Allocation in Customer Hierarchies; 1.3. Problem Focus and Research Questions; 1.4. Overview of Approach; 2. Supply Chain Planning and Demand Fulfillment; 2.1. Supply Chain Planning; 2.1.1. Supply Chain Management; 2.1.2. Hierarchical Planning

2.1.3. Interrelations between Planning Tasks2.1.4. The Position of the Customer Order Decoupling Point; 2.1.5. Advanced Planning Systems; 2.2. Demand Planning; 2.2.1. Objectives and Planning Tasks; 2.2.2. Demand Planning Structures and Forecasting Hierarchies; 2.2.3. Demand Planning Processes and Forecasting Procedures; 2.2.4. Demand Planning Controlling and Forecast Error Measures; 2.2.5. Hierarchical Forecasting; 2.3. Master Planning; 2.3.1. Objectives and Planning Tasks; 2.3.2. Basic Master Planning Model; 2.4. Demand Fulfillment; 2.4.1. Objectives and Planning Tasks

2.4.2. Types of Demand Fulfillment Systems2.4.3. Basic Models for Demand Fulfillment; 2.4.4. State of the Art: Demand Fulfillment in MTS Environments; 2.5. Conclusions: Allocation Problems in Supply Chain Planning; 3. Multi-Stage Customer Hierarchies; 3.1. Formal Hierarchies; 3.1.1. Trees and Hierarchies; 3.1.2. Aggregation and Disaggregation; 3.2. Decision-Making in Hierarchies; 3.3. Customer Hierarchies and Hierarchical Sales Organizations; 3.3.1. Customer Segmentation and Customer Profitability; 3.3.2. A Formal Model of Customer Hierarchies; 3.3.3. Hierarchical Sales Organizations

3.3.4. Customer Hierarchies in the Context of the Schneeweiß Framework3.4. Forecast Misrepresentation in Customer Hierarchies; 3.4.1. Sales Forecasting and Agency Problems; 3.4.2. Compensation Schemes for Demand-Constrained Supply Chains; 3.4.3. Compensation Schemes for Supply-Constrained Supply Chains; 3.4.4. Forecast Misrepresentations: Empirical and Experimental Evidence; 3.4.5. Application to Customer Hierarchies; 3.5. Measures of Heterogeneity in Customer Hierarchies; 3.5.1. Inequality and Heterogeneity Measurement; 3.5.2. Standard Heterogeneity Measures

3.5.3. Generalized Entropy Inequality Measures and Theil's Index3.5.4. Comparison of Heterogeneity Measures; 4. Allocation Planning and Disaggregation in Customer Hierarchies; 4.1. Notation and Formal Model; 4.2. Existing Quantity-Based Allocation Schemes; 4.2.1. Type 1: Based on Demand, Pro Rata; 4.2.2. Type 2: Based on Another Key Figure, Pro Rata; 4.2.3. Type 3: Based on Demand, Disproportionally; 4.2.4. Type 4: Based on Another Key Figure, Disproportionally; 4.2.5. Stochastic or Unknown Supply Quantities; 4.3. Basic Profit-Based Allocation Schemes; 4.3.1. Optimal Central Allocation (OCA)

4.3.2. Optimal Decentral Allocation (ODA)

This book extends the existing demand fulfillment research by considering multi-stage customer hierarchies. Basis is a two-step allocation and consumption planning procedure. In the existing literature, it is assumed that the customer segments are 'flat'. This means they can be sorted easily during the allocation planning step by a single central planner in decreasing order of profitability. In the subsequent consumption planning phase, if order requests differ in terms of profit margins, companies can render prioritized service in real time to their most profitable customers by consuming the reserved quotas.

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Dr. Sebastian Vogel wrote his dissertation under Prof. Dr. Herbert Meyr's supervision at the Chair of Production and Supply Chain Management at the Technische Universität Darmstadt.</p>

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