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American Indians and Popular Culture.

By: Hoffman, Elizabeth DeLaney.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Santa Barbara : ABC-CLIO, 2012Description: 1 online resource (809 p.).ISBN: 9780313379918.Subject(s): Ethnic attitudes -- United States | Indians in popular culture -- United States | Indians of North America -- Public opinion | Indians of North America -- Social life and customs | Public opinion -- United States | Stereotypes (Social psychology) -- United States | United States -- Civilization -- Indian influences | United States -- Ethnic relationsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: American Indians and Popular CultureDDC classification: 305.897 LOC classification: E98.P99 A465 2012Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Volume 1: Media, Sports, and Politics; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. Portrayals of American Indians in Early Radio; 2. American Indians in Silent Film, 1894-1929; 3. Writing Indian Stereotypes: The Role of the Screenplay in American Westerns; 4. Elvis as Indian in Film and Life; 5. Cries with Indians: "Going Indian" with the Ecological Indian from Rousseau to Avatar; 6. American Indian Feature Filmmakers and Popular Culture; 7. "It's a Good Day to Be Indigenous": Sherman Alexie's Films; 8. Boarding and Residential School Experiences in Film
9. Ubiquitous American Indian Stereotypes in Television10. American Indians in Print Advertising since 1890; 11. The Continuing Hunt for Willie Boy, 1909-2009; 12. Jackpot! Marketing the American Indian Casino; 13. How Kennewick Man and Media Constructs Frame Indian Identity; 14. Will Electronic Media Be the Death or Rebirth of Endangered American Indian Languages?; 15. Native People in American Mythology and Popular Culture; 16. American Indian Sports: A Historical Overview; 17. How Boarding School Basketball Became Indian Basketball
18. American Indian Imagery in Sport and the Public Imagination19. Sacagawea: Super Hero, Super Woman, Super Myth; 20. Mardi Gras Indians: Spiritualism or Indian Stereotype?; 21. Indians in the Military; 22. The American Indian Movement in Popular Culture; 23. Seneca Resistance: Surviving the Kinzua Dam; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; X; Y; About the Editor and Contributors; Volume 2: Literature, Arts, and Resistance; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. Anticipating the Renaissance: Cogewea and Trends in Modern American Indian Literature
2. Leslie Marmon Silko: Mapping Radical Histories and Futures3. Windigo Cars and High-Stakes Gambling in the Novels of Louise Erdrich; 4. Sherman Alexie and Popular Culture: Magic in the Mix; 5. The Curious Case of Asa Carter and The Education of Little Tree; 6. The "Savage" Sublime in Novels by A. A. Carr and Joseph Boyden; 7. Twilight: A Worldwide Pop Phenomenon with a Quileute Slant; 8. Alaska Native Writers and the Power of Stories; 9. MacGyvering Pop Culture: Blending Traditions in Canada; 10. "This is the world without end": American Indian Poetry from 1980-2010
11. Writing the Rez: Popular Obsessions in the Works of Eric Gansworth12. Art, Authenticity, and Identity at Santa Fe Indian Market; 13. Leap of Faith: Contemporary American Indian Art and American Visual Culture; 14. Indigenous Architecture; 15. American Indians in Post-World War II Popular Music; 16. Rez Riddims: Reggae and American Indians; 17. Notions of Indianness and Contemporary Native Dance; 18. Powwows; 19. Powwow Dance; 20. Adaptation as Tradition: Southwestern Indians and Pop Culture; 21. Living in Vitrines: Museum Treatments of American Indians
22. Where Are the Blankets? Where Is the Pottery? The Institute of American Indian Arts Nears Fifty
Summary: Americans are still fascinated by the romantic notion of the ""noble savage,"" yet know little about the real Native peoples of North America. This two-volume work seeks to remedy that by examining stereotypes and celebrating the true cultures of American Indians today.
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Cover; Volume 1: Media, Sports, and Politics; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. Portrayals of American Indians in Early Radio; 2. American Indians in Silent Film, 1894-1929; 3. Writing Indian Stereotypes: The Role of the Screenplay in American Westerns; 4. Elvis as Indian in Film and Life; 5. Cries with Indians: "Going Indian" with the Ecological Indian from Rousseau to Avatar; 6. American Indian Feature Filmmakers and Popular Culture; 7. "It's a Good Day to Be Indigenous": Sherman Alexie's Films; 8. Boarding and Residential School Experiences in Film

9. Ubiquitous American Indian Stereotypes in Television10. American Indians in Print Advertising since 1890; 11. The Continuing Hunt for Willie Boy, 1909-2009; 12. Jackpot! Marketing the American Indian Casino; 13. How Kennewick Man and Media Constructs Frame Indian Identity; 14. Will Electronic Media Be the Death or Rebirth of Endangered American Indian Languages?; 15. Native People in American Mythology and Popular Culture; 16. American Indian Sports: A Historical Overview; 17. How Boarding School Basketball Became Indian Basketball

18. American Indian Imagery in Sport and the Public Imagination19. Sacagawea: Super Hero, Super Woman, Super Myth; 20. Mardi Gras Indians: Spiritualism or Indian Stereotype?; 21. Indians in the Military; 22. The American Indian Movement in Popular Culture; 23. Seneca Resistance: Surviving the Kinzua Dam; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; X; Y; About the Editor and Contributors; Volume 2: Literature, Arts, and Resistance; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. Anticipating the Renaissance: Cogewea and Trends in Modern American Indian Literature

2. Leslie Marmon Silko: Mapping Radical Histories and Futures3. Windigo Cars and High-Stakes Gambling in the Novels of Louise Erdrich; 4. Sherman Alexie and Popular Culture: Magic in the Mix; 5. The Curious Case of Asa Carter and The Education of Little Tree; 6. The "Savage" Sublime in Novels by A. A. Carr and Joseph Boyden; 7. Twilight: A Worldwide Pop Phenomenon with a Quileute Slant; 8. Alaska Native Writers and the Power of Stories; 9. MacGyvering Pop Culture: Blending Traditions in Canada; 10. "This is the world without end": American Indian Poetry from 1980-2010

11. Writing the Rez: Popular Obsessions in the Works of Eric Gansworth12. Art, Authenticity, and Identity at Santa Fe Indian Market; 13. Leap of Faith: Contemporary American Indian Art and American Visual Culture; 14. Indigenous Architecture; 15. American Indians in Post-World War II Popular Music; 16. Rez Riddims: Reggae and American Indians; 17. Notions of Indianness and Contemporary Native Dance; 18. Powwows; 19. Powwow Dance; 20. Adaptation as Tradition: Southwestern Indians and Pop Culture; 21. Living in Vitrines: Museum Treatments of American Indians

22. Where Are the Blankets? Where Is the Pottery? The Institute of American Indian Arts Nears Fifty

Americans are still fascinated by the romantic notion of the ""noble savage,"" yet know little about the real Native peoples of North America. This two-volume work seeks to remedy that by examining stereotypes and celebrating the true cultures of American Indians today.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Hoffman's (English, Athens Technical Coll., GA; "American Indian Studies" series) 46 essays explore, respond to, and discuss historical and current stereotypes and expectations of American Indians as presented in radio, film, television, advertisements, literature, music, dance, museums, and sports. Entries are generally ten to 15 pages in length and are arranged first by focus, with Volume 1 covering media, sports, and politics and Volume 2 literature, arts, and resistance. Within that, material is chronologically arranged. Most articles focus on the United States, although there is some Canadian coverage. Hoffman also includes important history, such as involvement in the U.S. military and in the struggle for civil rights. Article examples include "American Indian Feature Filmmakers and Popular Culture," "How Boarding School Basketball Became Indian Basketball," "Twilight: A Worldwide Pop Phenomenon with a Quileute Slant." Each volume has its own, separately written introduction and its own index, though no comprehensive index is provided. Articles are signed and include bibliographies. Searches in OCLC and LOC revealed several recent theses positing together Native American people and popular culture. However, no recent reference set was located. VERDICT Recommended for public, school, and academic libraries.-Lura Sanborn, St. Paul's Sch. Lib., NH (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

This excellent two-volume set comprises 46 essays that cover historical and contemporary American Indian representations in the media, sports, politics, literature, arts, and the civil rights movement. For the most part, the contributors (who are both Native and non-Native, US and Canadian) move from a general introduction to the topic, which may place the topic within a larger historical context and provide some disciplinary or biographical information, to a detailed examination; bibliographic citations direct the reader to additional resources. One gets a strong sense of how these representations came about and the changes they underwent through time and of the response of American Indian filmmakers, artists, and writers to those often-stereotypical portrayals. One example: the essays that treat the portrayal of American Indians in film consider early radio, silent films, Elvis in films, television, boarding-school portrayals, and Sherman Alexie's films, among other things. Although there are a number of books on American Indian representations in film, in this collection Hoffman (English, Athens Technical College) offers a richness of approaches to the subject hitherto unavailable in a single volume. The collection is extremely interesting and thought provoking and would be a true asset to any library. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates and above; professionals; general readers. B. Hans University of North Dakota

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Elizabeth DeLaney Hoffman teaches English at Athens Technical College, Athens, GA, and is coeditor of Telling the Stories: Essays on American Indian Literatures and Cultures .</p>

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