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Do the Crime, Do the Time.

By: Mays, G. Larry.
Contributor(s): Ruddell, Richard K.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Santa Barbara : ABC-CLIO, 2012Description: 1 online resource (265 p.).ISBN: 9780313392436.Subject(s): Justice, Administration of -- United States | Juvenile delinquents -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- United States | Juvenile justice, Administration of -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Do the Crime, Do the TimeDDC classification: 364.360973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Do the Crime, Do the Time; Title; Copyright; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; ONE: Adult Time for Adult Crimes; TWO: Understanding the System; THREE: Juvenile Crime and Transfer Trends; FOUR: Transfers and Public Policy; FIVE: The Supreme Court Defines the Boundaries of Juvenile Justice; SIX: Public Opinion, Public Policy, and Juvenile Justice; SEVEN: Implications of Transfers for Juvenile Offenders; EIGHT: Future of Transfers; Cases Cited; References; Index; About the Authors
Summary: This book provides a fresh look at the way the United States is choosing to deal with some of the serious or persistent youth offenders: by transferring juvenile offenders to adult courts.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
KF9794 .M393 2012 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=871454 Available EBL871454

Cover; Do the Crime, Do the Time; Title; Copyright; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; ONE: Adult Time for Adult Crimes; TWO: Understanding the System; THREE: Juvenile Crime and Transfer Trends; FOUR: Transfers and Public Policy; FIVE: The Supreme Court Defines the Boundaries of Juvenile Justice; SIX: Public Opinion, Public Policy, and Juvenile Justice; SEVEN: Implications of Transfers for Juvenile Offenders; EIGHT: Future of Transfers; Cases Cited; References; Index; About the Authors

This book provides a fresh look at the way the United States is choosing to deal with some of the serious or persistent youth offenders: by transferring juvenile offenders to adult courts.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Since the advent of juvenile justice courts in 1899, Americans have questioned whether serious juvenile offenders should be treated like children or sentenced like adults. In their comprehensive overview, Mays (emer., New Mexico State Univ.) and Ruddell (Univ. of Regina, Canada) explain how the rehabilitative goals of juvenile justice reformers have been altered by recent policies allowing juvenile offenders to be transferred to adult criminal court. While they acknowledge that such transfers could protect the public from violent juvenile offenders, the widespread practice more often affects lesser delinquents, such as drug users and property offenders. The public generally supports more punitive policies; however, transferring nonviolent juveniles to adult court does not always result in tougher sentences. Moreover, these policies have produced unintended consequences: youth have been denied valuable rehabilitative programming; jails have suffered from increased overcrowding; minority communities have been disproportionately impacted; and prosecutors have been given more power than juvenile court judges to determine the fate of youthful offenders. Consequently, the authors caution that, in time, transfer policies could lead to an increase in crime and a decreased confidence in the justice system. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduate, graduate, research, and professional collections. J. E. Walsh Azusa Pacific University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> G. Larry Mays , PhD, is Regents Professor Emeritus of Criminal Justice at New Mexico State University, Las Cruces. Mays is author or editor of 18 books and nearly 100 scholarly articles, book chapters, encyclopedia entries, and practitioner publications.</p> <p> Rick Ruddell , PhD, is Law Foundation of Saskatchewan Chair in Police Studies and faculty in the Department of Justice Studies at the University of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. Ruddell received his doctorate in criminology and criminal justice at the University of Missouri, St. Louis, and his research has focused upon policing, criminal justice policy, and juvenile justice.</p>

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