Cumulative Effects in Wildlife Management : Impact Mitigation

By: Krausman, Paul RContributor(s): Harris, Lisa KMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2012Description: 1 online resource (278 p.)ISBN: 9781439809174Subject(s): Animals --Effect of human beings on | Environmental impact analysis | Wildlife conservation | Wildlife managementGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Cumulative Effects in Wildlife Management : Impact MitigationDDC classification: 333.95/416 LOC classification: QL82.C86 2011Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Front Cover; Contents; Preface; Acknowledgments; About the Editors; Contributors; Chapter 1: Grappling with Cumulative Effects; Chapter 2: The NEPA Process : What the Law Says; Chapter 3: Regulating and Planning for Cumulative Effects : The Canadian Experience; Chapter 4: Quantifying Cumulative Effects; Chapter 5: The Economics of Cumulative Effects : Ecological and Macro by Nature; Chapter 6: U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Environmental Waivers and Cumulative Effects; Chapter 7: Piecemealing Paradise : Cumulative Effects on Scenic Quality in the Coronado National Forest
Chapter 8: Understanding the Cumulative Effects of Human Activities on Barren-Ground CaribouChapter 9: The Cumulative Effects of Suburban and Exurban Influences on Wildlife; Chapter 10: Cumulative Effects on Freshwater Fishes; Chapter 11: Sage-Grouse and Cumulative Impacts of Energy Development; References; Back Cover
Summary: As humans continue to encroach on wildlands, quality and quantity of wildlife habitat decreases before our eyes. A housing development here, a shopping mall there, a few more trees cut here, another road put in there, each of these diminishes available habitat. Unless the cumulative effects of multiple simultaneous development projects are recognized and incorporated at the beginning of project development, we will continue to see wildlife habitat disappear at unprecedented rates.Divided into two parts, Cumulative Effects in Wildlife Management emphasizes the
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Front Cover; Contents; Preface; Acknowledgments; About the Editors; Contributors; Chapter 1: Grappling with Cumulative Effects; Chapter 2: The NEPA Process : What the Law Says; Chapter 3: Regulating and Planning for Cumulative Effects : The Canadian Experience; Chapter 4: Quantifying Cumulative Effects; Chapter 5: The Economics of Cumulative Effects : Ecological and Macro by Nature; Chapter 6: U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Environmental Waivers and Cumulative Effects; Chapter 7: Piecemealing Paradise : Cumulative Effects on Scenic Quality in the Coronado National Forest

Chapter 8: Understanding the Cumulative Effects of Human Activities on Barren-Ground CaribouChapter 9: The Cumulative Effects of Suburban and Exurban Influences on Wildlife; Chapter 10: Cumulative Effects on Freshwater Fishes; Chapter 11: Sage-Grouse and Cumulative Impacts of Energy Development; References; Back Cover

As humans continue to encroach on wildlands, quality and quantity of wildlife habitat decreases before our eyes. A housing development here, a shopping mall there, a few more trees cut here, another road put in there, each of these diminishes available habitat. Unless the cumulative effects of multiple simultaneous development projects are recognized and incorporated at the beginning of project development, we will continue to see wildlife habitat disappear at unprecedented rates.Divided into two parts, Cumulative Effects in Wildlife Management emphasizes the

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Human encroachment on forests and rangeland, including gas, oil, coal, wind, and solar energy developments, destroy or fragment wildlife habitat. When added to past, present, and foreseeable future actions, these direct and indirect impacts on the environment accumulate over time and space, with serious consequences for wildlife and fish populations. Planners, focusing on immediate direct impacts of developments, overlook these cumulative effects. This book urges land use planners and policy makers to recognize and incorporate the cumulative effects of development in future projects. The book is divided into two parts. Part 1 opens with a case study of the cumulative effects of a mining project. Subsequent chapters review the relevant sections of the National Environmental Policy Act; planning for, regulating, and quantifying cumulative effects; and addressing the economics involved. Part 2, "Case Studies," includes excellent chapters on suburban and exurban effects on wildlife, freshwater fish cumulative effects, and the effects of energy developments on the sage grouse. This book belongs in the working library of land planners and policy makers and can serve as a supplemental resource for advanced courses in wildlife management and land use policy. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. R. L. Smith emeritus, West Virginia University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Paul R. Krausman received his B.S. in zoology from the Ohio State University, M.S. in wildlife science from New Mexico State University, and Ph.D. from the University of Idaho. He has taught and conducted research at Auburn University, the University of Arizona, Wildlife Institute of India, and the University of Montana. He has concentrated his research and teaching on wildlife management, especially in arid areas in the Southwest, North Africa, and India, and in areas where there are significant anthropogenic influences on wildlife habitats. Paul is a certified wildlife biologist, active with The Wildlife Society (TWS) (currently president-elect), a TWS Fellow, and received the Leopold Award and Medal. He has published hundreds of scientific articles, reports, and papers, and several books. He is currently the Boone and Crockett Professor of Wildlife Conservation at the University of Montana, Missoula.

Lisa K. Harris, Ph.D., received her degrees from the University of Chicago and the University of Arizona. She has developed a successful environmental consulting firm guiding government agencies through compliance with the National Environmental Protection Act, Endangered Species Act, National Historical Preservation Act, and other environmental regulations. Identifying and analyzing cumulative effects are a constant issue in her work. A prolific writer with wide-ranging interests, Dr. Harris has published scientific articles on natural resource conservation, land use modeling, effects of military impacts on endangered species, cactus transplantation, as well as popular press articles and essays on adventure travel, parenting, health and fitness, cycling, and food. She lives in Tucson, Arizona, with her two daughters and a menagerie of four-footed friends. Whenever possible, she slips on a backpack and heads to road's end.

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