Normal view MARC view ISBD view

The Politics of Dialogic Imagination : Power and Popular Culture in Early Modern Japan

By: Hirano, Katsuya.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Chicago Studies in Practices of Meaning: Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource (305 p.).ISBN: 9780226060736.Subject(s): Arts, Political aspects -- Japan -- History -- 19th century | Human body -- Political aspects -- Japan | Human body in popular culture -- Political aspects -- Japan | Japan -- Cultural policy -- History -- 19th century | Japan -- Politics and government -- 1600-1868 | Japanese wit and humor -- Political aspects | Kabuki -- Government policy -- Japan -- History | Popular culture -- Government policy -- Japan -- HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Politics of Dialogic Imagination : Power and Popular Culture in Early Modern JapanDDC classification: 306.095209034 LOC classification: NX180.P64 .H57 2013Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. Strategies of Containment and Their Aporia; 2. Parody and History in Late Tokugawa Culture; 3. Comic Realism: A Strategy of Inversion; 4. Grotesque Realism: A Strategy of Chaos; 5. Reconfiguring the Body in a Modernizing Japan; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: In The Politics of Dialogic Imagination, Katsuya Hirano seeks to understand why, with its seemingly unrivaled power, the Tokugawa shogunate of early modern Japan tried so hard to regulate the ostensibly unimportant popular culture of Edo (present-day Tokyo)-including fashion, leisure activities, prints, and theater. He does so by examining the works of writers and artists who depicted and celebrated the culture of play and pleasure associated with Edo's street entertainers, vagrants, actors, and prostitutes, whom Tokugawa authorities condemned to be detrimental to public mores, soc
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
NX180.P64 .H57 2013 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1441176 Available EBL1441176

Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. Strategies of Containment and Their Aporia; 2. Parody and History in Late Tokugawa Culture; 3. Comic Realism: A Strategy of Inversion; 4. Grotesque Realism: A Strategy of Chaos; 5. Reconfiguring the Body in a Modernizing Japan; Notes; Bibliography; Index

In The Politics of Dialogic Imagination, Katsuya Hirano seeks to understand why, with its seemingly unrivaled power, the Tokugawa shogunate of early modern Japan tried so hard to regulate the ostensibly unimportant popular culture of Edo (present-day Tokyo)-including fashion, leisure activities, prints, and theater. He does so by examining the works of writers and artists who depicted and celebrated the culture of play and pleasure associated with Edo's street entertainers, vagrants, actors, and prostitutes, whom Tokugawa authorities condemned to be detrimental to public mores, soc

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

As the title's derivation from Mikhail Bakhtin's The Dialogic Imagination (CH, Jul'81) would suggest, historian Hirano (Cornell) provides an interdisciplinary study of Tokugawa popular culture that draws heavily not just on Bakhtin, but on other Western theorists. He examines parody and other kinds of humor in early modern Japan as the result of the relationship between the state and the "body." Hirano uses Kabuki, illustrated books, and woodblock prints to form the basis of his argument that "the Tokugawa government constructed its mechanisms of rule based on a fundamental distrust of the body," and he "probes the implications of social, economic and ideological structures after 1868" in the mind-body relationship. Literary theorists and art and cultural historians will appreciate this linkage to more universal intellectual trends and careful interpretation of specific texts and images, but historians of early modern Japan will be troubled by the representation of the Tokugawa shogunate as an unchanging monolith, the subsuming of chronology to argument, and other methodological choices. Despite these flaws, Hirano makes some interesting points about the relation of the state to popular culture. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students and research libraries. M. Chaiklin University of Pittsburgh

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.