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Buddhism, War, and Nationalism : Chinese Monks in the Struggle Against Japanese Aggression 1931-1945

By: Yu, Xue.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.East Asia: History, Politics, Sociology and Culture: Publisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2013Description: 1 online resource (293 p.).ISBN: 9781135487324.Subject(s): Buddhism -- Social aspects -- China | Sino-Japanese War, 1937-1945 | War -- Religious aspectsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Buddhism, War, and Nationalism : Chinese Monks in the Struggle Against Japanese Aggression 1931-1945DDC classification: 294.3/37273/0951 | 294.3372730951 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Foreword; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Chapter One Changing Buddhism in Modern China; Chapter Two Buddhism and National Defending; Chapter Three Propaganda against Japanese Aggressions; Chapter Four Buddhist Participation in the War; Chapter Five Buddhism in Japanese-Occupied Areas; Chapter Six Taixu and Buddhism after the War; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: This thesis examines the doctrinal grounds and different approaches to working out this ""new Buddhist tradition,"" a startling contrast to the teachings of non-violence and compassion which have made Buddhism known as a religion of peace. In scores of articles as war approached in 1936-37, new monks searched and reinterpreted scripture, making controversial arguments for ideas like ""compassionate killing"" which would justify participating in war.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
BQ645 .Y82 2013 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1474915 Available EBL1474915

Cover; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Foreword; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Chapter One Changing Buddhism in Modern China; Chapter Two Buddhism and National Defending; Chapter Three Propaganda against Japanese Aggressions; Chapter Four Buddhist Participation in the War; Chapter Five Buddhism in Japanese-Occupied Areas; Chapter Six Taixu and Buddhism after the War; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index

This thesis examines the doctrinal grounds and different approaches to working out this ""new Buddhist tradition,"" a startling contrast to the teachings of non-violence and compassion which have made Buddhism known as a religion of peace. In scores of articles as war approached in 1936-37, new monks searched and reinterpreted scripture, making controversial arguments for ideas like ""compassionate killing"" which would justify participating in war.

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Xue Yu is Director of the Centre for the Study of Humanistic Buddhism at the Chinese University of Hong Kong.

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