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From Marriage to the Market : Transformation of Women''s Lives and Work

By: Thistle, Susan.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Berkeley : University of California Press, 2006Description: 1 online resource (311 p.).ISBN: 9780520939196.Subject(s): Women | Women - Employment - United States - History - 20th century | Work and familyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: From Marriage to the Market : Transformation of Women''s Lives and WorkDDC classification: 305.4 | 331.4097309045 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
CONTENTS; List of Figures; List of Tables; Acknowledgments; 1. A World Turned Inside Out; 2. Support for Women's Domestic Economy in the Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries; 3. The Breakdown of Women's Domestic Economy after World War II; 4. Economic Difficulties and a Contradictory Alliance; 5. The Formation of a Female Underclass; 6. The "New Economy" and the Transformation of Women's Work; 7. How and Why Mothers Have Been Shortchanged; 8. New Possibilities and Old Inequalities; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: Presenting a comparative analysis of African American women''s and white women''s relationships to home and work, this study provides an overview of how this shift influences the shape of families and the American economy. It brings together the issues and statistics to put gender at the center of the social and economic changes.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HD6095 .T49 2006eb (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=265553 Available EBL265553

CONTENTS; List of Figures; List of Tables; Acknowledgments; 1. A World Turned Inside Out; 2. Support for Women's Domestic Economy in the Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries; 3. The Breakdown of Women's Domestic Economy after World War II; 4. Economic Difficulties and a Contradictory Alliance; 5. The Formation of a Female Underclass; 6. The "New Economy" and the Transformation of Women's Work; 7. How and Why Mothers Have Been Shortchanged; 8. New Possibilities and Old Inequalities; Notes; Bibliography; Index

Presenting a comparative analysis of African American women''s and white women''s relationships to home and work, this study provides an overview of how this shift influences the shape of families and the American economy. It brings together the issues and statistics to put gender at the center of the social and economic changes.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Thistle (Northwestern Univ.) retells and reanalyzes the transformation of women's labor from household to paid employment. The historic review is not unique; the perspective, however, is. Rather than focusing on how industrialization removed men from household life and relegated women to positions of unpaid homemaker and underpaid employee, Thistle highlights transformations in domestic work as a significant factor underlying women's transition into the paid labor force, exploring these changes across race. In this process, Thistle argues, white middle-income women were better able to maintain commitments to domesticity through the support of a range of public policies (protective legislation, the family wage, etc.) up through the mid-20th century. Racism, Reconstruction, and urban and rural poverty made it more difficult for African Americans to resist market pressures to perform a double shift of paid and unpaid labor. Economic restructuring in the later 20th century, along with normative and legal changes, undermined the ability of women across races to preserve time and space for domestic work. Today, less than one-third of white women and one-tenth of black women depend primarily on men's income for support, relying on their own wages in addition to the unpaid work they do for family and within households. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. S. K. Gallagher Oregon State University

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