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The other great migration : the movement of rural African Americans to Houston, 1900-1941 / Bernadette Pruitt.

By: Pruitt, Bernadette, 1965-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Sam Rayburn series on rural life: no. 21.Publisher: College Station : Texas A&M University Press, 2013Edition: 1st ed.Description: xxi, 453 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9781603449489 (book/cloth : alk. paper); 1603449485 (book/cloth : alk. paper); 9781623490034 (ebook format/all ebooks); 1623490030 (ebook format/all ebooks).Subject(s): African-Americans -- Texas -- Houston -- Migrations -- History -- 20th century | Rural-urban migration -- Texas -- Houston -- History -- 20th century | Migration, Internal -- Texas -- Houston -- History -- 20th century | African Americans -- Texas -- Houston -- Social conditions -- 20th century | Houston (Tex.) -- Social conditions -- 20th century | Community development -- Texas -- Houston -- History -- 20th century | Houston (Tex.) -- Race relations -- History -- 20th century
Contents:
Pulling up the stakes: the great migration to Houston, 1900-1930 -- Building a city: migrant settlements in Houston, 1900-1941 -- Beautiful people: agency in Houston, 1900-1941 -- "That was their protection and safeguard": Houston's "new Negro," 1917-1941 -- In "the Garden of Eden": the Houston Renaissance, 1900-1941 -- The black economy at work: wage earners, professionals, economic crisis, and the origins of the second great migration, 1900-1941.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
3rd floor display case
F394.H89 N48 2013 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002191468

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Pulling up the stakes: the great migration to Houston, 1900-1930 -- Building a city: migrant settlements in Houston, 1900-1941 -- Beautiful people: agency in Houston, 1900-1941 -- "That was their protection and safeguard": Houston's "new Negro," 1917-1941 -- In "the Garden of Eden": the Houston Renaissance, 1900-1941 -- The black economy at work: wage earners, professionals, economic crisis, and the origins of the second great migration, 1900-1941.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The story of the great migration is most often told as one of southern rural African Americans moving to northern cities. The migrations were also within the South. The history of African American migration to Houston is important. Through detailed biographical sketches, oral histories, newspapers, and census records, as well as a thorough reading of the secondary literature, Pruitt (Sam Houston State Univ.) re-creates the migration of thousands of Texas and Louisiana African Americans to Houston. The reproduction of photographs depicting migrant life strengthens the narrative. The story parallels that of migrants to northern cities. Motivated by harsh rural social and economic conditions, migrants moved to Houston, often in small transitory steps, before making the move permanent. In Houston, the migrants congregated in segregated black communities centered on social organizations, churches, schools, small black businesses, and an often thriving arts community. The last was community building, but also a source of civil rights protest. For its many strengths, this book suffers from more than an occasional unsupported generalization, redundancy, and a conclusion that is more of an introduction to the migrations that followed than a conclusion to the book at hand. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, researchers, and faculty. T. F. Armstrong Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research, UAE

Author notes provided by Syndetics

BERNADETTE PRUITT is an associate professor of history at Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas. With a PhD from the University of Houston, she is a former recipient of the Mary M. Hughes and Fred White Jr. Research Fellowships in Texas History from the Texas State Historical Association.<br>

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