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Step by step, 1936-1939.

By: Churchill, Winston, 1874-1965.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Essay index reprint series: Publisher: Freeport, N.Y., Books for Libraries Press [1971, c1939]Description: xii, 323 p. port. 24 cm.ISBN: 0836923103; 9780836923100.Subject(s): Europe -- Politics and government -- 1918-1945 | Great Britain -- Foreign relations -- 1936-1945DDC classification: 940.5/2 LOC classification: D727 | .C54 1971
Contents:
Britain, Germany, and Locarno -- Stop it now! -- Where do we stand? -- How Germany is arming -- Our navy must be stronger -- Organize our supplies -- How to stop war -- Why sanctions failed -- Dusk approaches -- The Spanish tragedy -- Keep out of Spain -- Enemies to the left -- A testing time for France -- An object lesson from Spain -- The communist schism -- Gathering storm -- In Mediterranean waters -- Germany and Japan -- The pledge of France -- Mr. Baldwin's revival -- No intervention in Spain -- How to meet the bill -- Europe's peace -- France faces a new crisis -- Germany's claim for colonies -- Rebuilding the battle fleet -- Can the powers bring peace to Spain? -- The new phase in India -- Germany and the low countries -- Defending the empire -- America looks at Europe -- The Rome-Berlin Axis -- "Vive la France!" -- The ebbing tide of socialism -- Palestine partition -- Anglo-Italian friendship -how? -- A plain word to the nazis -- The wounded dragon -- Friendship with Germany -- The dictators have smiled -- War is not imminent -- Yugoslavia and Europe -- Armistice -or peace? -- Spain's road to peace -- What we ask of the United States -- Panorama of 1937 -- Britain rearms -- What Japan thinks of us -- The dusk of the league -- It's not all over yet -- Carry on! -- The Austrian eye-opener -- Red sunset in Spain -- The new French government -- Britain's deficiencies in aircraft manufacture -- Britain and Italy -- Japan entangled -- National service -- Shadows over Czechoslovakia -- The rape of Austria -- Thoughts on the royal visit -- The United States and Europe -- German maneuvers -- Is air-power decisive? -- The European crisis -- France after Munich -- Palestine -- The Japanese burden -- The Morrow of Munich -- France and England -- New lights in Eastern Europe -- The Spanish ulcer -- The Anglo-German naval agreement -- Mussolini's cares -- The lull in Europe -- Hope in Spain -- Is it peace? -- The crunch -- Mussolini's choice -- After President Roosevelt's message -- The Russian counterpoise -- The Anglo-Turkish alliance.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D727 .C54 1971 (Browse shelf) Available 0000101074136

Britain, Germany, and Locarno -- Stop it now! -- Where do we stand? -- How Germany is arming -- Our navy must be stronger -- Organize our supplies -- How to stop war -- Why sanctions failed -- Dusk approaches -- The Spanish tragedy -- Keep out of Spain -- Enemies to the left -- A testing time for France -- An object lesson from Spain -- The communist schism -- Gathering storm -- In Mediterranean waters -- Germany and Japan -- The pledge of France -- Mr. Baldwin's revival -- No intervention in Spain -- How to meet the bill -- Europe's peace -- France faces a new crisis -- Germany's claim for colonies -- Rebuilding the battle fleet -- Can the powers bring peace to Spain? -- The new phase in India -- Germany and the low countries -- Defending the empire -- America looks at Europe -- The Rome-Berlin Axis -- "Vive la France!" -- The ebbing tide of socialism -- Palestine partition -- Anglo-Italian friendship -how? -- A plain word to the nazis -- The wounded dragon -- Friendship with Germany -- The dictators have smiled -- War is not imminent -- Yugoslavia and Europe -- Armistice -or peace? -- Spain's road to peace -- What we ask of the United States -- Panorama of 1937 -- Britain rearms -- What Japan thinks of us -- The dusk of the league -- It's not all over yet -- Carry on! -- The Austrian eye-opener -- Red sunset in Spain -- The new French government -- Britain's deficiencies in aircraft manufacture -- Britain and Italy -- Japan entangled -- National service -- Shadows over Czechoslovakia -- The rape of Austria -- Thoughts on the royal visit -- The United States and Europe -- German maneuvers -- Is air-power decisive? -- The European crisis -- France after Munich -- Palestine -- The Japanese burden -- The Morrow of Munich -- France and England -- New lights in Eastern Europe -- The Spanish ulcer -- The Anglo-German naval agreement -- Mussolini's cares -- The lull in Europe -- Hope in Spain -- Is it peace? -- The crunch -- Mussolini's choice -- After President Roosevelt's message -- The Russian counterpoise -- The Anglo-Turkish alliance.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill was born at Blenheim Palace on November 30, 1874 and educated at Harrow and Sandhurst. His military service included periods spent in Cuba, India, the Sudan, and in France during World War I. He became a Member of Parliament in 1900 and held many high offices of state under four different prime ministers. He was the Prime Minister of Great Britain during World War II. <p> Churchill's writing career began with campaign reports including The Story of the Malakand Field Force and The River War. In 1900, he published his only novel Savrola. His other works include Lord Randolph Churchill; Marlborough, a four-volume biography of his ancestor the 1st Duke of Marlborough; The World Crisis, a four-volume history of World War I; The Second World War, a six-volume history; and A History of the English. History of the English-Speaking Peoples, a six-volume work was completed toward the end of his life. In 1953, Churchill received the Nobel Prize for Literature, in recognition of his extensive writing as well as for his speeches throughout his career as a statesman. That same year, he was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II. He died on January 24, 1965 at the age of 90. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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