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NASA in the World : Fifty Years of International Collaboration in Space

By: Krige, John.
Contributor(s): Callahan, Angelina Long | Maharaj, Ashok.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Palgrave Studies in the History of Science and Technology: Publisher: New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013Description: 1 online resource (373 p.).ISBN: 9781137340931.Subject(s): Astronautics -- International cooperation | Astronautics -- United States -- History | Outer space -- Exploration -- United States -- History | United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration -- HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: NASA in the World : Fifty Years of International Collaboration in SpaceDDC classification: 629.40973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; List of Illustrations; Acknowledgments; List of Archives Consulted; List of Interviews; List of Abbreviations; Part I Fifty Years of NASA and the World; Chapter 1 Introduction and Historical Overview: NASA's International Relations in Space; Part II NASA and Western Europe; Chapter 2 NASA, Space Science, and Western Europe; Chapter 3 Technology Transfer with Western Europe: NASA-ELDO Relations in the 1960s; Chapter 4 European Participation in the Post-Apollo Program, 1969-1970: The Paine Years
Chapter 5 European Participation in the Post-Apollo Program, 1971: The United States Begins to Have Second Thoughts-And So Do the EuropeansChapter 6 European Participation in the Post-Apollo Program, 1972: Disentangling the Alliance-The Victory of Clean Technological Interfaces; Part III NASA and the Soviet Union/Russia; Chapter 7 Sustaining Soviet-American Collaboration, 1957-1989; Chapter 8 Russian-American Cooperation in Space: Privatization, Remuneration, and Collective Security; Part IV NASA and Emerging Space Powers
Chapter 9 An Overview of NASA-Japan Relations from Pencil Rockets to the International Space StationChapter 10 NASA and the Politics of Delta Launch Vehicle Technology Transfer to Japan; Chapter 11 An Overview of NASA-India Relations; Chapter 12 Satellite Broadcasting in Rural India: The SITE Project; Part V Into the Twenty-First Century; Chapter 13 Space Collaboration Today: The ISS; Chapter 14 The Impact of the International Traffic in Arms Regulations; Chapter 15 Conclusion; Notes; Index
Summary: Since its inception, NASA has participated in over 4,000 international projects, yet historians have almost entirely neglected this remarkable aspect of the agency's work. This groundbreaking work is the first to trace NASA's history in a truly international context, drawing on unprecedented access to agency archives and personnel.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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TL521.312 .N3725 2013 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1514132 Available EBL1514132

Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; List of Illustrations; Acknowledgments; List of Archives Consulted; List of Interviews; List of Abbreviations; Part I Fifty Years of NASA and the World; Chapter 1 Introduction and Historical Overview: NASA's International Relations in Space; Part II NASA and Western Europe; Chapter 2 NASA, Space Science, and Western Europe; Chapter 3 Technology Transfer with Western Europe: NASA-ELDO Relations in the 1960s; Chapter 4 European Participation in the Post-Apollo Program, 1969-1970: The Paine Years

Chapter 5 European Participation in the Post-Apollo Program, 1971: The United States Begins to Have Second Thoughts-And So Do the EuropeansChapter 6 European Participation in the Post-Apollo Program, 1972: Disentangling the Alliance-The Victory of Clean Technological Interfaces; Part III NASA and the Soviet Union/Russia; Chapter 7 Sustaining Soviet-American Collaboration, 1957-1989; Chapter 8 Russian-American Cooperation in Space: Privatization, Remuneration, and Collective Security; Part IV NASA and Emerging Space Powers

Chapter 9 An Overview of NASA-Japan Relations from Pencil Rockets to the International Space StationChapter 10 NASA and the Politics of Delta Launch Vehicle Technology Transfer to Japan; Chapter 11 An Overview of NASA-India Relations; Chapter 12 Satellite Broadcasting in Rural India: The SITE Project; Part V Into the Twenty-First Century; Chapter 13 Space Collaboration Today: The ISS; Chapter 14 The Impact of the International Traffic in Arms Regulations; Chapter 15 Conclusion; Notes; Index

Since its inception, NASA has participated in over 4,000 international projects, yet historians have almost entirely neglected this remarkable aspect of the agency's work. This groundbreaking work is the first to trace NASA's history in a truly international context, drawing on unprecedented access to agency archives and personnel.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Krige (Georgia Institute of Technology) and his coauthors analyze NASA's wide-ranging but complex efforts at international collaboration beginning late in the Apollo program and continuing through the International Space Station. Krige's introduction and section on cooperative efforts with Western Europe represent the heart of the study, and highlight inherent conflicts in which NASA negotiated between its own desire to maintain leadership in space, diplomatic efforts to foster collaboration, and Defense Department aversions to technology transfer. The dictum of no exchange of funds and clean interfaces served NASA's purpose into the 1980s, but this broke down, especially with the development of the International Space Station. Then, as Callahan explains in her section on the Soviet Union/Russia, the Russian contributions became central to the station's success, and its demands for more comprehensive participation penetrated previous barriers. Maharaj's chapters are on Japan, where internal pressure to develop its own launch system influenced its participation, and India, also plagued by internal politics but nonetheless a participant in a successful project of delivering satellite feeds to a remote rural area. Overall, this study conveys the wide range of NASA's international collaboration while confronting complicated political issues that characterized virtually all such efforts. Summing Up: Recommended. Most levels/libraries. A. J. Dunar University of Alabama in Huntsville

Author notes provided by Syndetics

John Krige is Kranzberg Professor in the School of History, Technology and Society at the Georgia Institute of Technology, USA, and the author of American Hegemony and the Postwar Reconstruction of Science in Europe (2006). An acknowledged expert on the history of the space program, he has appeared in recent years on American Public Radio, the BBC, and Swiss Radio.<br> <br> Angelina Long Callahan is Associate Historian at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, DC, USA, where she wrote her dissertation on meteorological satellites and the Cold War. She has a PhD from the Georgia Institute of Technology's School of History, Technology, and Society. Her other research pursuits include the history of 1920-30s drone research and development and technological roots of the Vanguard satellite project.<br> <br> Ashok Maharaj has a PhD from the Georgia Institute of Technology's School of History, Technology, and Society, USA. He lives and works in Chennai, India.<br>

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