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Dietary Supplement Regulation in the United States.

By: Wallace, Taylor C.
Contributor(s): MacKay, Douglas | Al-Mondhiry, Rend | Nguyen, Haiuyen | Griffiths, James C.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.SpringerBriefs in Food, Health, and Nutrition: Publisher: Dordrecht : Springer, 2013Description: 1 online resource (51 p.).ISBN: 9783319015026.Subject(s): Dietary supplements -- Law and legislation -- United States | Drugs -- Law and legislation -- United States | Legislation, Drug -- United States | United States. Food and Drug AdministrationGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Dietary Supplement Regulation in the United StatesDDC classification: 363.19 | 540 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Abstract; Chapter 1: Dietary Supplement Regulation in the United States; 1.1 Introduction; 1.1.1 A Historical Overview of Legislation and Regulation Before the 1994 Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act; 1.1.2 Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994; 1.1.2.1 Defining Dietary Supplements; 1.1.2.2 Developing Safety Standards; 1.1.2.3 Establishing Good Manufacturing Practices; 1.1.2.4 Addressing Labeling and Claims; 1.2 Current Good Manufacturing Practices; 1.2.1 Personnel; 1.2.2 Physical Plants; 1.2.3 Equipment and Utensils; 1.2.4 Production and Process Controls
1.2.5 Holding and Distribution1.2.6 Returned Dietary Supplements; 1.2.7 Product Complaints; 1.3 Safety Standards; 1.3.1 Dietary Supplement Safety; 1.3.2 Dietary Ingredient Safety; 1.3.3 Adverse Event Reporting; 1.4 Labeling; 1.4.1 Addressing Labeling and Claims; 1.4.1.1 Statement of Identity and Net Quantity of Contents; 1.4.1.2 Nutrition Labeling; 1.4.1.3 Ingredients Statement; 1.4.1.4 Name and Place of Business; 1.4.1.5 Additional Mandatory Label Statements; 1.4.1.6 Disclaimers and Disclosures; 1.4.2 Dietary Supplement Claims; 1.4.2.1 Health Claims; 1.4.2.2 Structure/Function Claims
1.4.2.3 Nutrient Content Claims1.4.3 FTC Advertising Regulation; 1.4.3.1 Internet and Social Media; 1.4.3.2 Organic Claims and Environmental Benefit Claims; 1.4.3.3 Industry Self-Regulation and the CRN/NAD Dietary Supplement Advertising Review Program; 1.5 International Regulations; 1.5.1 European Union; 1.5.2 United Kingdom; 1.5.3 Canada; 1.5.4 Japan; References
Summary: Contrary to the common belief that dietary supplements are ""unregulated"" in the United States, nutrients and other dietary ingredient-containing products have been regulated in this country for a little over a century at least in some capacity, initially through the Pure Food and Drug Act (PFDA) of 1906 and culminating with the many anticipated regulations to be implemented following the recent enactment of the Food Safety Modernization Act of 2010 (FSMA).   The goal of this brief is to review and discuss the current statutes and regulations surrounding the ingredients, manufacturing standa
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
RA401 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1466423 Available EBL1466423

Contents; Abstract; Chapter 1: Dietary Supplement Regulation in the United States; 1.1 Introduction; 1.1.1 A Historical Overview of Legislation and Regulation Before the 1994 Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act; 1.1.2 Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994; 1.1.2.1 Defining Dietary Supplements; 1.1.2.2 Developing Safety Standards; 1.1.2.3 Establishing Good Manufacturing Practices; 1.1.2.4 Addressing Labeling and Claims; 1.2 Current Good Manufacturing Practices; 1.2.1 Personnel; 1.2.2 Physical Plants; 1.2.3 Equipment and Utensils; 1.2.4 Production and Process Controls

1.2.5 Holding and Distribution1.2.6 Returned Dietary Supplements; 1.2.7 Product Complaints; 1.3 Safety Standards; 1.3.1 Dietary Supplement Safety; 1.3.2 Dietary Ingredient Safety; 1.3.3 Adverse Event Reporting; 1.4 Labeling; 1.4.1 Addressing Labeling and Claims; 1.4.1.1 Statement of Identity and Net Quantity of Contents; 1.4.1.2 Nutrition Labeling; 1.4.1.3 Ingredients Statement; 1.4.1.4 Name and Place of Business; 1.4.1.5 Additional Mandatory Label Statements; 1.4.1.6 Disclaimers and Disclosures; 1.4.2 Dietary Supplement Claims; 1.4.2.1 Health Claims; 1.4.2.2 Structure/Function Claims

1.4.2.3 Nutrient Content Claims1.4.3 FTC Advertising Regulation; 1.4.3.1 Internet and Social Media; 1.4.3.2 Organic Claims and Environmental Benefit Claims; 1.4.3.3 Industry Self-Regulation and the CRN/NAD Dietary Supplement Advertising Review Program; 1.5 International Regulations; 1.5.1 European Union; 1.5.2 United Kingdom; 1.5.3 Canada; 1.5.4 Japan; References

Contrary to the common belief that dietary supplements are ""unregulated"" in the United States, nutrients and other dietary ingredient-containing products have been regulated in this country for a little over a century at least in some capacity, initially through the Pure Food and Drug Act (PFDA) of 1906 and culminating with the many anticipated regulations to be implemented following the recent enactment of the Food Safety Modernization Act of 2010 (FSMA).   The goal of this brief is to review and discuss the current statutes and regulations surrounding the ingredients, manufacturing standa

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