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The great depression; the United States in the thirties, by Robert Goldston. Illustrated with photos. and drawings by Donald Carrick.

By: Goldston, Robert C.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Indianapolis, Bobbs-Merrill [1968]Edition: [1st ed.].Description: 218 p. illus., ports. 24 cm.Subject(s): United States -- Economic conditions -- 1918-1945 | United States -- Economic policy -- 1933-1945 | United States -- Social conditions -- 1933-1945 | Depressions -- 1929 -- United States | Depressions 1929 United States | United States Economic conditions 1918-1945 | United States Economic policy 1933-1945 | United States Social conditions 1933-1945Additional physical formats: Online version:: Great depression.DDC classification: 309.1/73
Contents:
The crash -- Brother, can you spare a dime -- Year of crisis -- The emergence of the New Deal -- The hundred days--and a day -- The first New Deal -- Other voices, other dooms -- The second wave -- Grapes of wrath, wine of hope -- The rise of labor -- Stalemate, recession, and the steady drummer.
Summary: A study of the economic, social and political factors which contributed to the tragic collapse of the life of the nation in the thirties, ironically brought to an end by the outbreak of World War II with its accompanying return to employment.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HC106.3 .G58 (Browse shelf) Available 0000101080935

Bibliography: p. 201-205.

The crash -- Brother, can you spare a dime -- Year of crisis -- The emergence of the New Deal -- The hundred days--and a day -- The first New Deal -- Other voices, other dooms -- The second wave -- Grapes of wrath, wine of hope -- The rise of labor -- Stalemate, recession, and the steady drummer.

A study of the economic, social and political factors which contributed to the tragic collapse of the life of the nation in the thirties, ironically brought to an end by the outbreak of World War II with its accompanying return to employment.

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