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Wildlife Behavior and Conservation / by Richard H. Yahner.

By: Yahner, Richard H [author.].
Contributor(s): SpringerLink (Online service).
Material type: TextTextSeries: Springer.Publisher: New York, NY : Springer New York, 2012Description: XXI, 173 p. 39 illus. online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781461415183.Subject(s): Life sciences | Animal behavior | Animal ecology | Wildlife management | Environmental management | Nature ConservationAdditional physical formats: Printed edition:: No titleDDC classification: 591.7 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
1. Comparative Psychology vs. Ethology -- 2.Genetics and Other Mechanisms Affecting Behavior -- 3. Mate-acquisition -- 4. Mating Systems and Parental Care -- 5. Dispersal and Corridors -- 6. Food-acquisition Systems -- 7. Additional Adaptations Against Predation -- 8. Habitat Selection -- 9. Home Range and Homing -- 10. Spacing Mechanisms -- 11. Dominance Hierarchies.-12. Communication -- 13. Olfactory Communication -- 14. Auditory Communication.-15. Ultrasounds and Other Types of Communication -- 16. Winter Strategies -- 17. Migration, Orientation, and Navigation -- 18. Competition.
In: Springer eBooksSummary: Wildlife Conservation and Behavior focuses on conservation, behavior, and ecology of wildlife. In this text, wildlife is defined as animals and plants, including domesticated and wild forms. For instance, domestic forms of dogs and pigs have crossed the line recently between domesticated and wild forms. The first chapters focus on traditional behavior as it relates to psychology. In later chapters, the focus is more on traditional behavior. The extensive reference section will be useful for undergraduate students interested in wildlife behavior. Also, this text will be of interest to those whose focus is simply the outdoors and associated wildlife. Today, most people are interested in wildlife but are unsure about the behavior of wildlife.  Hopefully, this book will help to bridge this gap.  
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-1518-3 Available 978-1-4614-1518-3

1. Comparative Psychology vs. Ethology -- 2.Genetics and Other Mechanisms Affecting Behavior -- 3. Mate-acquisition -- 4. Mating Systems and Parental Care -- 5. Dispersal and Corridors -- 6. Food-acquisition Systems -- 7. Additional Adaptations Against Predation -- 8. Habitat Selection -- 9. Home Range and Homing -- 10. Spacing Mechanisms -- 11. Dominance Hierarchies.-12. Communication -- 13. Olfactory Communication -- 14. Auditory Communication.-15. Ultrasounds and Other Types of Communication -- 16. Winter Strategies -- 17. Migration, Orientation, and Navigation -- 18. Competition.

Wildlife Conservation and Behavior focuses on conservation, behavior, and ecology of wildlife. In this text, wildlife is defined as animals and plants, including domesticated and wild forms. For instance, domestic forms of dogs and pigs have crossed the line recently between domesticated and wild forms. The first chapters focus on traditional behavior as it relates to psychology. In later chapters, the focus is more on traditional behavior. The extensive reference section will be useful for undergraduate students interested in wildlife behavior. Also, this text will be of interest to those whose focus is simply the outdoors and associated wildlife. Today, most people are interested in wildlife but are unsure about the behavior of wildlife.  Hopefully, this book will help to bridge this gap.  

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Yahner (Penn State) covers the field of wildlife behavior and conservation in 18 short chapters. He begins with a chapter that defines his topic and compares ethology and comparative psychology approaches. The following chapter examines an array of aspects that affect an organism's behavior. The next 16 chapters deal with specific kinds of behaviors such as mating, competition, and food-getting. Each chapter is fully cited and has simple black-and-white drawings of a variety of animals that apparently were done just for the book. The chapter citations appear in an alphabetized reference section. The index is complete and includes people, behaviors, and structures. Yahner uses a wide range of sources, but much of the material comes from Perspectives on Animal Behavior, by J. Goodenough, B. McGuire, and R. Wallace (2nd ed., 2001), and from many research papers authored by Yahner and occasionally his graduate students. Unfortunately, there are numerous errors scattered throughout the book. This might be an ideal resource for an upper-level or graduate seminar. It would also be a quick read for anyone interested in animal behavior. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates, graduate students, and general readers. L. T. Spencer emeritus, Plymouth State University

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