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People, Places and Landscapes : Social Change in High Amenity Rural Areas / by Richard S. Krannich, A. E. Luloff, Donald R. Field.

By: Krannich, Richard S [author.].
Contributor(s): Luloff, A. E [author.] | Field, Donald R [author.] | SpringerLink (Online service).
Material type: TextTextSeries: Springer.Landscape Series: 14Publisher: Dordrecht : Springer Netherlands, 2011Description: X, 170 p. online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9789400712638.Subject(s): Life sciences | Regional planning | Landscape ecology | Environmental management | Social sciences | Human GeographyAdditional physical formats: Printed edition:: No titleDDC classification: 577 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook. In: Springer eBooksSummary: This volume is a cogent empirical analysis of the interplay between a region’s natural amenities and its socioeconomic  evolution. It focuses on the rural sectors of America’s Intermountain West region, which lies between the Cascades and Sierra Nevada mountains to the west and the Rocky Mountains to the east. Coherently structured and meticulously detailed, it adds much to our understanding of the ways an area’s forests, lakes, mountains, parkland and historic attractions affect residents’ sense of well-being as well as the sociodemographic and economic changes they experience. The book examines patterns of growth and change linked to the emergence of ‘New West’ conditions, assessing their implications for the wider community as well as discussing the impact these trends could have on the consumption of natural resources. It also points to ways in which communities and their development can be managed sustainably.   The tight geographical focus of this valuable resource ensures a depth of analysis which can be applied to similar regions worldwide. Based on a large-scale, random-sample survey of both full-time and seasonal residents, it provides a much-needed overview of the macro-level economic, demographic, and social transformations affecting rural communities in America. As such, the book has relevance for all researchers concerned with rural development, the changes impacting rural landscapes, and natural resource management.
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https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-1263-8 Available 978-94-007-1263-8

This volume is a cogent empirical analysis of the interplay between a region’s natural amenities and its socioeconomic  evolution. It focuses on the rural sectors of America’s Intermountain West region, which lies between the Cascades and Sierra Nevada mountains to the west and the Rocky Mountains to the east. Coherently structured and meticulously detailed, it adds much to our understanding of the ways an area’s forests, lakes, mountains, parkland and historic attractions affect residents’ sense of well-being as well as the sociodemographic and economic changes they experience. The book examines patterns of growth and change linked to the emergence of ‘New West’ conditions, assessing their implications for the wider community as well as discussing the impact these trends could have on the consumption of natural resources. It also points to ways in which communities and their development can be managed sustainably.   The tight geographical focus of this valuable resource ensures a depth of analysis which can be applied to similar regions worldwide. Based on a large-scale, random-sample survey of both full-time and seasonal residents, it provides a much-needed overview of the macro-level economic, demographic, and social transformations affecting rural communities in America. As such, the book has relevance for all researchers concerned with rural development, the changes impacting rural landscapes, and natural resource management.

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CHOICE Review

Sociologists, planners, and residents have long been concerned with the "rural paradox," the fact that some rural areas struggle even as neighboring communities grow and develop. These scholars find that as rural communities in the Rocky Mountains and Colorado Plateau shift from resource extraction to recreation and leisure, areas with fewer natural amenities in the Great Plains and Wyoming Basin do not experience the same economic and population growth. This book represents a career-long collaboration among Krannich (sociology, Utah State Univ.), Luloff (rural sociology, Penn State), and Field (forest and wildlife ecology, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison). They bring together a range of methods and levels of analysis; subregional and community data are nested in regional-level changes. A key contribution is to operationalize the social, demographic, and economic changes that differentiate the "New West" from the "Old West." While this text would not serve undergraduates as well as would others, such as David L. Brown and Kai Schafft's Rural People and Communities in the 21st Century: Resilience and Transformation (2011), it is an exemplary regional study and makes important contributions to rural sociology, planning, and environmental policy. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate level and beyond. A. C. S. Swords Ithaca College

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