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The Great War in Russian Memory.

By: Petrone, Karen.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Bloomington, IN : Indiana University Press, 2011Description: 1 online resource (408 p.).ISBN: 9780253001443.Subject(s): Collective memory -- Soviet Union -- History | Patriotism -- Soviet Union -- History | Political culture -- Soviet Union -- History | Soviet Union -- Politics and government -- 1917-1936 | Soviet Union -- Politics and government -- 1936-1953 | Soviet Union -- Social conditions -- 1917-1945 | War and society -- Soviet Union -- History | War memorials -- Soviet Union -- History | World War, 1914-1918 -- Influence | World War, 1914-1918 -- Social aspects -- Soviet UnionGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Great War in Russian MemoryDDC classification: 940.3/47 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; 1 Introduction · The Great War in Russian Memory; 2 Spirituality, the Supernatural, and the Memory of World War I; 3 The Paradoxes of Gender in Soviet War Memory; 4 Violence, Morality, and the Conscience of the Warrior; 5 World War I and the Definition of Russianness; 6 Arrested History; 7 Disappearance and Reappearance; 8 Legacies of the Great War; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: Karen Petrone shatters the notion that World War I was a forgotten war in the Soviet Union. Although never officially commemorated, the Great War was the subject of a lively discourse about religion, heroism, violence, and patriotism during the interwar period. Using memoirs, literature, films, military histories, and archival materials, Petrone reconstructs Soviet ideas regarding the motivations for fighting, the justification for killing, the nature of the enemy, and the qualities of a hero. She reveals
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
D524.7 .S65 P48 2011 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=731389 Available EBL731389

Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; 1 Introduction · The Great War in Russian Memory; 2 Spirituality, the Supernatural, and the Memory of World War I; 3 The Paradoxes of Gender in Soviet War Memory; 4 Violence, Morality, and the Conscience of the Warrior; 5 World War I and the Definition of Russianness; 6 Arrested History; 7 Disappearance and Reappearance; 8 Legacies of the Great War; Notes; Bibliography; Index

Karen Petrone shatters the notion that World War I was a forgotten war in the Soviet Union. Although never officially commemorated, the Great War was the subject of a lively discourse about religion, heroism, violence, and patriotism during the interwar period. Using memoirs, literature, films, military histories, and archival materials, Petrone reconstructs Soviet ideas regarding the motivations for fighting, the justification for killing, the nature of the enemy, and the qualities of a hero. She reveals

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This important book radically alters understanding of the Russian and Soviet responses to WW I during the interwar period and up to 1945. Most scholars have believed until now that the response to WW I in Russia and the Soviet Union differed from that in the rest of Europe, and was muted or suppressed by the political leadership who wanted to focus attention on the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution and the civil war of 1918-21. Petrone (Kentucky), however, persuasively argues that although the official Soviet response downplayed the impact of the war and did not establish an overarching mythic narrative of the war, there was a wide variety of public remembrances of the war because so many people were directly touched by it. The author skillfully analyzes films, graphic arts, novels, short stories, journalism, architecture, memoirs, paintings, museum exhibits, and many other expressions of people's memory of the war to demonstrate the main themes of this discourse as well as how it changed over time. The book deserves a wide readership. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. N. M. Brooks New Mexico State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Karen Petrone is Associate Professor of History at the University of Kentucky. She is author of Life Has Become More Joyous, Comrades: Celebrations in the Time of Stalin (IUP, 2000) and editor (with Valerie Kivelson, Michael S. Flier, and Nancy Shields Kollmann) of The New Muscovite Cultural History: A Collection in Honor of Daniel B. Rowland.</p>

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