Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Fatness and the Maternal Body : Women''s Experiences of Corporeality and the Shaping of Social Policy

By: Unnithan-Kumar, Maya.
Contributor(s): Tremayne, Soraya.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Fertility, Reproduction and Sexuality: Publisher: New York, NY : Berghahn Books, 2011Edition: 1.Description: 1 online resource (248 p.).ISBN: 9780857451231.Subject(s): Body image in women | Human body -- Social aspects | Human body -- Symbolic aspects | Obesity in women | Women -- PhysiologyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Fatness and the Maternal Body : Women''s Experiences of Corporeality and the Shaping of Social PolicyDDC classification: 362.1963980082 LOC classification: RA625.O23F37 2011Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Fatness and the Maternal Body; Contents; List of Figures; List of Tables; Preface; Chapter 1. Introduction; Chapter 2. The Traffic in ''Nature''; Chapter 3. Fat and Fertility, Mobility and Slaves; Chapter 4. Women of Great Weight; Chapter 5. Childbearing, Breastfeeding and Body Weight in Tanzania; Chapter 6. The ''Obesity Cycle''; Chapter 7. Culture, Diet and the Maternal Body; Chapter 8. Unhealthy, Unwealthy, Unwise; Chapter 9. The Maharaja Mac; Chapter 10. Is there a Relation between Fatness and Reproductive Health?; Chapter 11. Reproducing Inequalities; Notes on Contributors; Index
Summary: Obesity is a rising global health problem. On the one hand a clearly defined medical condition, it is at the same time a corporeal state embedded in the social and cultural perception of fatness, body shape and size. Focusing specifically on the maternal body, contributors to the volume examine how the language and notions of obesity connect with, or stand apart from, wider societal values and moralities to do with the body, fatness, reproduction and what is considered 'natural'. A focus on fatness in the context of human reproduction and motherhood offers instructive insights into the global circulation and authority of biomedical facts on fatness (as 'risky' anti-fit, for example). As with other social and cultural studies critical of health policy discourse, this volume challenges the spontaneous connection being made in scientific and popular understanding between fatness and ill health.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
RA625.O23F37 2011 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=745327 Available EBL745327

Fatness and the Maternal Body; Contents; List of Figures; List of Tables; Preface; Chapter 1. Introduction; Chapter 2. The Traffic in ''Nature''; Chapter 3. Fat and Fertility, Mobility and Slaves; Chapter 4. Women of Great Weight; Chapter 5. Childbearing, Breastfeeding and Body Weight in Tanzania; Chapter 6. The ''Obesity Cycle''; Chapter 7. Culture, Diet and the Maternal Body; Chapter 8. Unhealthy, Unwealthy, Unwise; Chapter 9. The Maharaja Mac; Chapter 10. Is there a Relation between Fatness and Reproductive Health?; Chapter 11. Reproducing Inequalities; Notes on Contributors; Index

Obesity is a rising global health problem. On the one hand a clearly defined medical condition, it is at the same time a corporeal state embedded in the social and cultural perception of fatness, body shape and size. Focusing specifically on the maternal body, contributors to the volume examine how the language and notions of obesity connect with, or stand apart from, wider societal values and moralities to do with the body, fatness, reproduction and what is considered 'natural'. A focus on fatness in the context of human reproduction and motherhood offers instructive insights into the global circulation and authority of biomedical facts on fatness (as 'risky' anti-fit, for example). As with other social and cultural studies critical of health policy discourse, this volume challenges the spontaneous connection being made in scientific and popular understanding between fatness and ill health.

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Maya Unnithan-Kumar is Reader in Social Anthropology at the University of Sussex. She is currently leading an Economic and Social Research Council (UK)-funded research project on state-NGO relations as defined by their engagement with human rights discourse in the fields of sexual, maternal and reproductive health in India.</p>

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.